English

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Middle English plentiful, plentyfull, plentefull, equivalent to plenty +‎ -ful.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈplɛntɪfl̩/
  • Audio (US):(file)

Adjective

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plentiful (comparative plentifuller or plentifuler or more plentiful, superlative plentifullest or plentifulest or most plentiful)

  1. Existing in large number or ample amount.
    a plentiful harvest
    a plentiful supply of water
    She accumulated a plentiful collection of books.
  2. Yielding abundance; fruitful.
    Some years, the tree is a plentiful source of apples.
    • 1631, Francis [Bacon], “(please specify |century=I to X)”, in Sylua Syluarum: Or A Naturall Historie. In Ten Centuries. [], 3rd edition, London: [] William Rawley; [p]rinted by J[ohn] H[aviland] for William Lee [], →OCLC:
      If it be a long winter, it is commonly a more plentiful year.
  3. (obsolete) Lavish; profuse; prodigal.
    • 1625, Francis [Bacon], “Of Expense”, in The Essayes [], 3rd edition, London: [] Iohn Haviland for Hanna Barret, →OCLC:
      He that is plentiful in expenses will hardly be preserved from decay.

Synonyms

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Derived terms

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Translations

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The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Further reading

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