Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French prodigal, from Late Latin prodigalis(wasteful), from Latin prodigus(wasteful, lavish, prodigal), from prodigere(to consume, squander, drive forth), from pro(before, forward) + agere(to drive).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈpɹɒdɪɡəl/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈpɹɑdɪɡəl/, [ˈpʰɹɑɾɪɡɫ̩]

AdjectiveEdit

prodigal ‎(comparative more prodigal, superlative most prodigal)

  1. wastefully extravagant.
    He found himself guilty of prodigal spending during the holidays.
    He is a prodigal son.
  2. (often followed by of or with) someone yielding profusely, lavish
    She was a merry person, glad and prodigal of smiles.
    How can he be so prodigal with money on such a tight budget?
  3. profuse, lavishly abundant
  4. returning after abandoning a person, group, or ideal, especially for selfish reasons; being a prodigal son.
    • 2012 August 12, Paul Owen, “London 2012 Olympics: day 10”, in The Guardian[1]:
      Simon Hart of the Daily Telegraph has tweeted that the prodigal triple-jumper has come home, in preparation for tomorrow's qualification round.

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NounEdit

prodigal ‎(plural prodigals)

  1. A prodigal person, a spendthrift.

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