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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From late Middle English ample, from Middle French ample, from Latin amplus (large), probably for ambiplus (full on both sides), the last syllable akin to Latin plenus (full).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ample (comparative ampler, superlative amplest)

  1. Large; great in size, extent, capacity, or bulk; for example spacious, roomy or widely extended.
    an ample house
  2. Fully sufficient; abundant; plenty
    an ample amount
    an ample supply of water
    ample time
    ample material
    ample numbers
    ample space
    ample wealth
  3. Not contracted or brief; not concise; extended; diffusive
    an ample story

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin amplus.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ample (feminine ampla, masculine and feminine plural amples)

  1. wide
  2. ample, plentiful

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ample (plural amples)

  1. plentiful, abundant, copious, profuse, ample

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

AdverbEdit

amplē (comparative amplius, superlative amplissimē)

  1. amply, largely

Etymology 2Edit

AdjectiveEdit

ample

  1. vocative masculine singular of amplus

ReferencesEdit

  • ample in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ample in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle French ample, from Old French ample, from Latin amplus.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ample

  1. (Late Middle English) ample, copious, profuse

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: ample
  • Scots: ample

ReferencesEdit