English

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Etymology

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From late Middle English ample, from Middle French ample, from Latin amplus (large).

Pronunciation

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Determiner

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ample

  1. A fully sufficient or abundant quantity of; enough or more than enough.
    We have ample time to finish the task.
    It is a large house with ample space for all of us.
  2. (as pronoun) A quantity (of something) that is fully sufficient; plenty.
    We don't need any more. We already have ample.

Adjective

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ample (comparative ampler, superlative amplest)

  1. Large; great in size, extent, capacity, or bulk; for example spacious, roomy or widely extended.
    We have an ample supply of water
    She has a very ample bosom.
  2. Not contracted or brief; not concise; extended; diffusive
    an ample story

Synonyms

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Derived terms

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Translations

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The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

References

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Anagrams

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Catalan

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Etymology

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From Latin amplus.

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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ample (feminine ampla, masculine and feminine plural amples)

  1. wide
  2. ample, plentiful

Derived terms

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Further reading

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French

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Etymology

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Inherited from Old French ample, inheried from Latin amplus.[1]

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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ample (plural amples)

  1. plentiful, abundant, copious, profuse, ample
  2. (of clothes) loose, baggy

References

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  1. ^ Walther von Wartburg (1928–2002) “amplus”, in Französisches Etymologisches Wörterbuch (in German), volumes 24: Refonte A–Aorte, page 488

Further reading

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Latin

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Etymology 1

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Adverb

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amplē (comparative amplius, superlative amplissimē)

  1. amply, largely

Etymology 2

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Adjective

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ample

  1. vocative masculine singular of amplus

References

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  • ample”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ample”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers

Middle English

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Middle French ample, from Old French ample, from Latin amplus.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈampəl/, /ˈɛmpəl/

Adjective

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ample

  1. (Late Middle English) ample, copious, profuse
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Descendants

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  • English: ample
  • Scots: ample

References

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