See also: Grande

English edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from Italian grande. Doublet of grand and grandee.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡɹɑndeɪ/, /ˈɡɹændeɪ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɑndeɪ, -ændeɪ

Adjective edit

grande (not comparable)

  1. (chiefly US) Of a cup of coffee: smaller than venti but larger than tall, usually 16 ounces (~ 455 ml).
    Coordinate terms: tall, venti

Noun edit

grande (plural grandes)

  1. (chiefly US) A grande cup of coffee.
    • 1997, J. H. Marks, Conspiracy Theory, Signet, →ISBN, page 148:
      As she went to work the only concern prominent in her mind was a strong desire for a couple of grandes from Starbucks.
    • 1998, Doug Guinan, California Screaming, Simon & Schuster, →ISBN, page 287:
      Kevin considered bumming a cig, but he doubted any of them would part with one. Clutching their Starbucks grandes, guarding their garment bags with practiced eyes—how much sympathy could they be expected to muster?
    • 1999, Elizabeth Lenhard, Bettypalooza, Pocket Books, →ISBN, page 80:
      “Harrumph,” Daddy said, flipping through the morning’s deliveries – the L.A. Times, the New York Times and two grandes from Starbucks: decaf Colombian for my stressed superior, and a nonfat capp with a double espresso shot for me.

Etymology 2 edit

From Spanish grande. Doublet of grand.

Noun edit

grande (plural grandes)

  1. Alternative form of grandee.
    • 1847, T[erence] M[cMahon] Hughes, “Hercules Rafferty.—An Asturianillo.—An Irish stew.—A Bottle-Hero.—Don Tito de Chiclana.—O’Gorman.—Perils of love-making in the Peninsula.” (chapter VI), in An Overland Journey to Lisbon at the Close of 1846; with a Picture of the Actual State of Spain and Portugal, volume II, London: Henry Colburn, [], page 89:
      Console yourself with the practical philosophy of our countryman, Private Curtis, who was the picture of a Spanish Grande of the first class, and whom I once heard after a Lenten dinner extemporize with great good-humour this Leonine distich:⁠—“Quod deficit in ferculis / Supplebitur in poculis!”
    • 1912, Tiemen De Vries, Dutch History, Art and Literature for Americans: Lectures Given in the University of Chicago, Eerdmans-Sevensma Company, pages 85–86:
      When we read in almost every book in which the life of Philip is described that he was a man of haughty character with an aversion to every vulgarity; when we read of his ability in courting ladies, his manly beauty, his fine dress as a Spanish grande, we incline to think that before us stands a nobleman of kindred feelings, of carefully fostered nobility.
    • 1936 November 17, The New York Times Theater Reviews, pages 15–16:
      With the exception of the vital Otto Woegerer as Juan, a Spanish grande, equally quick to draw his rapier against Hamlet as to appear a mystically presaging friend, the rest of the large cast fills its space with satisfactory competence.
    • 1943, National Academy of Design Exhibition Record, 1826-1860, page 73:
      339. Portrait of a Spanish Grande.
    • 1952, German Review, page 19:
      Else, how could it be that a little Miss Mischief dresses up as a homely little Dutch farm girl, an awkward and uncouth youth parades in the costume and with the air of a Spanish grande, the respectable, quiet housewife becomes a sailor’s sweetheart, a little boy flirt assumes the detached air of a high priest a painstaking bookkeeper masquerades as a hold-up man or a bank robber with a record as a policeman?
    • 1966, Paul Bailey, The Claws of the Hawk: The Incredible Life of Wahker the Ute, Westernlore, →LCCN, page 90:
      Already you’re dressed like a Spanish grande, b’ God!
    • 1972, Helmut Anthony Hatzfeld, The Rococo: Eroticism, Wit, and Elegance in European Literature (Pegasus Movements in Literature Series), Pegasus, The Bobbs-Merrill Company, Inc., →LCCN, page 108:
      The two plays were originally sketched with a French milieu, but after Voltaire’s revolutionary pamphlet Le Droit du seigneur (1762) it seemed safer to invent a Spanish grande and his castle Aguas Frescas—the more alluring to Beaumarchais as he knew the milieu well from his stay of eleven months in Spain.
    • 1993, Eva Šormová, editor, Don Juan and Faust in the XXth Century: Theatre Conference, 27.9. - 1.10.1991, Prague, Charles University, →ISBN, page 274:
      So the attempt to seduce Zerlina freezes not only in the cold and monumental architecture of a black marble environment and in the stiff “overstyled” costuming, but also in the unresolvable, impossible role-conflict of a Spanish Grande trying to reach for something like John Wayne’s sex appeal.
    • 1993, Sue Rich, Rawhide and Roses, Pocket Books, →ISBN, page 229:
      From where they were, Hayden thought, it resembled the type of house a Spanish Grande might live in, neat, clean, with gentle arches framing the front portico.
    • 1996, Mozart Studien, volume 6, page 277:
      The essence of the opera’s entire plot is revealed in just 28 measures: in this first musical number here, »a Spanish grande, fallen in love with a young girl, endeavours to seduce her«.
    • 2000, P. C. Morantte, Brother to the Wind, New Day Publishers, →ISBN, page 45:
      Those that you see on Calle Real are owned by a Spanish grande who has a large coconut plantation.
    • 2004, Irene Awret, “Part One: Berlin”, in They’ll Have to Catch Me First: An Artist’s Coming of Age in the Third Reich, Madison, Wis.: The University of Wisconsin Press, →ISBN, page 36:
      Was it Uncle Richard’s fault that he looked like a Spanish Grande, that women rarely could resist his melancholy brown eyes smoldering with an indefinable something?
    • 2007, Koenraad Jonckheere, Adriaen Thomasz. Key (c. 1545–c. 1589): Portrait of a Calvinist Painter, Brepols, →ISBN, page 152:
      D18. Portrait of a Spanish grande
    • 2007, Karina Urbach, editor, European Aristocracies and the Radical Right 1918–1939, Oxford University Press, →ISBN, page 63:
      This son, James Fritz-James, was created a Spanish Grande and Duke of Liria by Philip V.
    • 2014, Peter de Vos, Confusion (Nothing Is What It Seems; 1), Kibworth Beauchamp, Leics: Matador, →ISBN, page 5:
      Gone was the affable behaviour of a loose-living playboy, replaced by the tough manners of a hard-working Chinese with the airs of a Spanish Grande.

Etymology 3 edit

From French grande, feminine of grand.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

grande (comparative more grande, superlative most grande)

  1. Alternative form of grand
    • 1972, Russell Sage College, Studies in the Twentieth Century, page 79:
      Almost symbolically, Lopahin still plays the peasant and Lyubov the grande mistress.
    • 1993, Donald S. Metz, Madame President, New Saga Publishers, →ISBN, pages 147, 270:
      A supremely happy family waved goodbye to an elderly grande dame and a namesake who had just enrolled in her first lesson in becoming a grande lady. [] In Litchfield, Connecticut, the Hutchinson brothers rushed to tell the grande old dame her daughter was making history.
    • 1997, Alzina Stone Dale, Mystery Reader’s Walking Guide: New York, →ISBN, page 217:
      In Shannon O’Cork’s The Murder of Muriel Lake, which is about a Writers of Mystery Convention (aka MWA?), grande mistress Muriel Lake was murdered.
    • 2011, Richard Allen Brooks, “Dame Johnson”, in From Life to Death, Xlibris, →ISBN, page 28:
      THIS GRANDE LADY IS
      DIS-TIN-GUISH-A-BLE IN HER
      DEMURE DELIVERIES.
      DELIGHTFUL AND DAZZLING,
      THE LADY IS DEFINITELY
      A DIVA.
    • 2013, Chet Belmonte, Meadowdale: A Saga of Confinement, AuthorHouse, →ISBN, page 223:
      That made eight deaths in a matter of a few days—all of them tied inexplicably to this “grande lady” herself—Meadowdale Prison.
    • 2016, Victor Milán, The Dinosaur Knights, Tor Books, →ISBN, page 101:
      Her silence now had the quality of the comfortable silences between friends, not the half-respectful, half-fearful types of a servant not spoken to by her grande mistress.
    • 2016, Jennie Gilbert Ross, The Wrong Side of the Blanket, Archway Publishing, →ISBN:
      Annabella Kristina Ramona Toaltz was a grande name for a grande woman.
Usage notes edit

This form, influenced by grande dame, is chiefly used when describing a woman.

Related terms edit

Anagrams edit

Asturian edit

Alternative forms edit

  • gran (apocopic, before a singular noun)

Etymology edit

From Latin grandis, grandem.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡɾande/, [ˈɡɾãn̪.d̪e]
  • Rhymes: -ande
  • Hyphenation: gran‧de

Adjective edit

grande (epicene, plural grandes)

  1. large, big
    Antonym: pequeñu

Related terms edit

Corsican edit

Etymology edit

From Latin grandis, grandem (large, great).

Adjective edit

grande

  1. big

Danish edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Spanish grande.

Noun edit

grande c (singular definite granden, plural indefinite grander)

  1. grandee
Declension edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Old Danish grannæ, from Old Norse granni, from Proto-Germanic *garaznô (neighbour).

Noun edit

grande c (singular definite granden, plural indefinite grander)

  1. (archaic) neighbour
Declension edit

French edit

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

grande

  1. feminine singular of grand

Anagrams edit

Galician edit

Alternative forms edit

  • gran (preceding a singular noun)

Etymology edit

From Old Galician-Portuguese grande, from Latin grandis, grandem.

Pronunciation edit

 
  • IPA(key): (standard) /ˈɡɾande/ [ˈɡɾan̪.d̪ɪ]
  • IPA(key): (gheada) /ˈħɾande/ [ˈħɾan̪.d̪ɪ]

  • Rhymes: -ande
  • Hyphenation: gran‧de

Adjective edit

grande m or f (plural grandes)

  1. large
    Synonyms: enorme, groso
    Eso foi de maeso; máis grande que a que eu levei.
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)

Further reading edit

Interlingua edit

Adjective edit

grande (comparative major, superlative le major or le maxime)

  1. big, large
    Antonym: parve
  2. great

Italian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin grandem, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ghrewə- (to fell, put down, fall in).

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

grande (plural grandi, comparative più grande or maggiore, superlative grandissimo or massimo or sommo, diminutive grandétto or grandìno or grandettìno or grandicèllo, augmentative grandóne or (rare) grandòtto, pejorative (rare) grandàccio)

  1. of greater physical dimensions or numerosity
    1. big, large (in size or quantity)
    2. tall
    3. wide, broad
    4. long
    5. older (in age, of a person)
      sorella grandeolder sister, big sister
  2. great (importance)
  3. (colloquial) Synonym of bravo

Usage notes edit

  • The apocopic form gran may be used before singular nouns that start with a consonant. Before singular nouns that start with an impure s, using the apocopic form is ungrammatical but often used in spoken language. Before nouns that start with a vowel, grande can be elided by use of an apostrophe.

Adverb edit

grande

  1. really (intensifier)
    un gran bel piattoa really great dish

Interjection edit

grande

  1. great!

Noun edit

grande m or f by sense (plural grandi)

  1. adult, grownup
  2. (usually in the plural) great (person of major significance)
    i grandi della literaturethe greats of literature

Noun edit

grande m (uncountable)

  1. greatness, magnificence
    ammirare il grande nell'arteto admire the greatness in art

Derived terms edit

Ladino edit

Etymology edit

From Latin grandis.

Adjective edit

grande (Latin spelling)

  1. big

Noun edit

grande m (Latin spelling)

  1. adult

Latin edit

Etymology edit

From grandis (large, great).

Adjective edit

grande

  1. nominative neuter singular of grandis

Adverb edit

grandē (comparative grandius, superlative grandissimē)

  1. greatly
  2. (poetic) loudly, aloud

Related terms edit

References edit

  • grande”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • grande”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • grande in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.
  • Carl Meißner, Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • a weighty example, precedent: exemplum magnum, grande
    • elevated, moderate, plain style: genus dicendi grave or grande, medium, tenue (cf. Or. 5. 20; 6. 21)
    • exorbitant rate of interest: fenus iniquissimum, grande, grave
    • to incur debts on a large scale: grande, magnum (opp. exiguum) aes alienum conflare
  • grande”, in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857), A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly
  • Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, 1st edition. (Oxford University Press)

Ligurian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Latin grandem, form of grandis.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

grande (masculine plural grendi, feminine plural grende)

  1. big
  2. large
  3. great

Antonyms edit

Norman edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (file)
    (Jersey)

Adjective edit

grande

  1. feminine singular of grànd, grand

Old French edit

Alternative forms edit

  • grant ('grande' steadily replaces 'grant' during the Old French period)

Adjective edit

grande

  1. nominative feminine singular of grant
    • late 12th century, anonymous author, “La Folie de Tristan d'Oxford”, in Le Roman de Tristan, Champion Classiques edition, →ISBN, page 354, lines 67–70:
      La nef ert fort e belle e grande,
      bone cum cele k'ert markande.
      De plusurs mers chargee esteit,
      en Engleterre curre devait.
      The ship was strong and beautiful and big,
      good like a merchant's ship
      loaded with lots of different type of merchandise
      ready to set sail to England.
  2. oblique feminine singular of grant

Old Galician-Portuguese edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Latin grandis, grandem.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

grande

  1. big, great

Descendants edit

  • Fala: grandi
  • Galician: grande
  • Portuguese: grande

Portuguese edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old Galician-Portuguese grande, from Latin grandis, of uncertain origin.

Pronunciation edit

 

  • Hyphenation: gran‧de

Adjective edit

grande m or f (plural grandes)

  1. large; great; big (of great size or extent)
    Este livro é grande.This book is big.
    Este livro é maior do que aquele.This book is bigger than that one.
  2. large; big; numerous (numerically large)
    Synonym: numeroso
    A família é muito grande.The family is very large.
  3. (preceding nouns) great (of great importance)
    Os grandes reis da antiguidade.The great kings of antiquity.
  4. (preceding nouns) great; magnanimous (noble and generous in spirit)
    Synonym: magnânimo
    Artur foi um grande rei.Arthur was a great king.
  5. grown-up; mature
    Synonyms: crescido, maduro
    Já és grande, podes trabalhar.You’re already grown-up, you can work.
  6. (followed by a city’s name) the metropolitan area of, greater
    Moro na grande Lisboa.I live in the metropolis of Lisbon.
    O Grande Porto é uma região metropolitana no norte de Portugal.Greater Porto is a metropolitan area in the north of Portugal.

Inflection edit

Quotations edit

For quotations using this term, see Citations:grande.

Synonyms edit

Antonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Noun edit

grande m or f by sense (plural grandes)

  1. (Brazil, colloquial, used in the vocative) A term of address for someone
    Synonyms: amigo, chefe

Further reading edit

Spanish edit

Alternative forms edit

  • gran (preceding a singular noun)

Etymology edit

Inherited from Latin grandem (large, great), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ghrewə- (to fell, put down, fall in).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡɾande/ [ˈɡɾãn̪.d̪e]
  • Audio:(file)
  • Rhymes: -ande
  • Syllabification: gran‧de

Adjective edit

grande m or f (masculine and feminine plural grandes, superlative grandísimo or mayor)

  1. (after the noun or predicatively) big, large
    Synonyms: (for cloth, shoe, place) amplio, voluminoso
    Antonyms: chico, pequeño
  2. (before a plural noun) great
    Synonym: grandioso
    Antonym: irrelevante
  3. (about human age) aged, old
    Synonyms: anciano, viejo
    Antonyms: chico, joven, pequeño
    Mi papá ya es muy grande para hacer eso.
    My dad is now a bit old to do that.

Usage notes edit

  • When used before and in the same noun phrase as the modified singular noun, the apocopic form gran (great) is used instead of grande.

Derived terms edit

Noun edit

grande m or f by sense (plural grandes)

  1. grandee

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

Further reading edit