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EnglishEdit

 
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Brazilian ex-president Lula da Silva wearing a poncho

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish poncho, from Quechua punchu. In sense “rubber rain poncho”, attested 1845, used for non-South American garments in the United States and England from 1850s, popularized by US Western expeditions and military from 1850s, particularly after World War II (1940s).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈpɒn.tʃəʊ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈpɑn.tʃoʊ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɒntʃəʊ

NounEdit

poncho (plural ponchos or ponchoes)

  1. A simple garment, made from a rectangle of cloth, with a slit in the middle for the head.
    • 1975, Margery Turner Fisher, Who's Who in Children's Books, page 203
      Garibaldi, with his cowboy's poncho, red shirt and the black ostrich feathers in his wide hat []
    • 2011, Bruce N. Anderson, Wingtips Under a Bolivian Poncho, page 130
      It was a gringo in a poncho. It was not really accurate to his suits worn today, but Julia would understand the symbolism that he was adapting to the culture and expectations while far away from home.
  2. A similar waterproof garment, today typically of rubber with a hood.
    • 1845, William Jameson, “Botanical Excursion to Salinas, an Indian Village on Chimborazo”, The London Journal of Botany, Volume 4, p. 382:
      [] spreading over my bedding an indian-rubber poncho to exclude the rain.
    • 1850, Romance of Modern Travel, p. 43:
      I [] took my seat between Juan and Ambrosio, protected from the rain by an India-rubber poncho.
    • 1857, Solomon Nunes Carvalho, Incidents of Travel and Adventure in the Far West, p. 48 (1857), p. 48 (1858):
    • I found it necessary while doing guard to cover myself with my India-rubber poncho, to prevent my clothes from becoming saturated with water.
    • 1859, Randolph Barnes Marcy, The Prairie Traveler, p. 39:
      The following list of articles is deemed a sufficient outfit for one man upon a three months’ expedition, viz.: [] 1 gutta percha poncho
    • 1858, “Robbery in a Railway Carriage” (1858 March 29), Edmund Burke ed., Annual Register (collected 1859), March p. 59:
      [] when near the old church in Manchester he was run against by a man whom he supposed to be a drunken man, who was dressed in a poncho overcoat.
    • 1888, William Eleroy Curtis, The capitals of Spanish America, p. 505:
      It is about the size of the rubber poncho used in the United States, []
    • 2001, Michael Rutter, Camping Made Easy, 2nd ed., page 98
      If you have to hike all day in a poncho, your pants will be wet thigh-high before long (never mind how fast you'll get wet if you have to go through wet brush or grass).

TranslationsEdit

Related termsEdit


FrenchEdit

NounEdit

poncho m (plural ponchos)

  1. poncho

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

poncho

  1. Rōmaji transcription of ポンチョ

KaraoEdit

NounEdit

poncho

  1. money collected for a common purpose

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish, from Quechua punchu.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

poncho m (plural ponchos)

  1. poncho

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpont͡ʃo/, [ˈpõnʲt͡ʃo]

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Quechua punchu.

NounEdit

poncho m (plural ponchos)

  1. poncho
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

poncho

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of ponchar.

Further readingEdit