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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English potentat, from Old French, from Late Latin potentātus (rule, political power), from Latin potēns (powerful, strong), the active present participle of possum (I am able).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

potentate (plural potentates)

  1. A powerful leader; a monarch; a ruler.
    • 1592, Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part I, act iii, scene 2
      But Kings and mightieſt Potentates muſt die,
      For that's the end of humane miſerie.
    • 1900, Theodore Dreiser, "Sister Carrie"
      She was now one of a group of oriental beauties who, in the second act of the comic opera, were paraded by the vizier before the new potentate as the treasures of his harem.
  2. A powerful polity or institution.
  3. (derogatory) A self-important person.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

potentate (comparative more potentate, superlative most potentate)

  1. (obsolete) Regnant, powerful, dominant.