EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English decre, decree, from Old French decré (French décret), from Latin dēcrētum.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /dɪˈkɹiː/
  • (file)

NounEdit

decree (plural decrees)

  1. An edict or law.
  2. (law) The judicial decision in a litigated cause rendered by a court of equity.
  3. (law) The determination of a cause in a court of admiralty or court of probate.
  4. (religion) A predetermination made by God; an act of providence.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

decree (third-person singular simple present decrees, present participle decreeing, simple past and past participle decreed)

  1. To command by a decree.
    A court decrees a restoration of property.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

decree

  1. Alternative form of decre