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See also: précédent and précèdent

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French, from Old French, from Latin praecēdēns, present participle of praecēdere (to precede); See precede.

PronunciationEdit

Adjective:

  • IPA(key): /pɹɪˈsiː.dənt/

Noun:

NounEdit

precedent (plural precedents)

  1. An act in the past which may be used as an example to help decide the outcome of similar instances in the future.
    • Hooker
      Examples for cases can but direct as precedents only.
  2. (law) A decided case which is cited or used as an example to justify a judgment in a subsequent case.
  3. (obsolete, with definite article) The aforementioned (thing).
    • 1621, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy, Oxford: Printed by Iohn Lichfield and Iames Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 216894069; The Anatomy of Melancholy: What It Is. With All the Kindes, Cavses, Symptomes, Prognosticks, and Seuerall Cvres of It. In Three Maine Partitions, with Their Seuerall Sections, Members, and Svbsections. Philosophically, Medicinally, Historically Opened and Cut Up, by Democritvs Iunior, with a Satyricall Preface, Conducing to the Following Discourse, 2nd corrected and augmented edition, Oxford: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, 1624, OCLC 54573970, (please specify |partition=1, 2, or 3):
      , New York 2001, p.74:
      A third argument may be derived from the precedent.
  4. The previous version.
  5. (obsolete) A rough draught of a writing which precedes a finished copy.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

precedent (not comparable)

  1. Happening or taking place earlier in time; previous or preceding. [from 14th c.]
  2. (now rare) Coming before in a particular order or arrangement; preceding, foregoing. [from 15th c.]
    • 1621, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy, Oxford: Printed by Iohn Lichfield and Iames Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 216894069; The Anatomy of Melancholy: What It Is. With All the Kindes, Cavses, Symptomes, Prognosticks, and Seuerall Cvres of It. In Three Maine Partitions, with Their Seuerall Sections, Members, and Svbsections. Philosophically, Medicinally, Historically Opened and Cut Up, by Democritvs Iunior, with a Satyricall Preface, Conducing to the Following Discourse, 2nd corrected and augmented edition, Oxford: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, 1624, OCLC 54573970, (please specify |partition=1, 2, or 3):
      , III.2.1.i:
      In the precedent section mention was made, amongst other pleasant objects, of this comeliness and beauty which proceeds from women […].

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

precedent (third-person singular simple present precedents, present participle precedenting, simple past and past participle precedented)

  1. (transitive, law) To provide precedents for.
  2. (transitive, law) To be a precedent for.

See alsoEdit


CatalanEdit

NounEdit

precedent m (plural precedents)

  1. precedent

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle French precedent. First attested in the 16th century.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˌpreː.seːˈdɛnt/, /ˌpreː.səˈdɛnt/
  • Hyphenation: pre‧ce‧dent
  • Rhymes: -ɛnt

NounEdit

precedent n (plural precedenten)

  1. precedent

Derived termsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin praecēdēns. Compare Middle French preceder.

AdjectiveEdit

precedent m (oblique and nominative feminine singular precedent or precedente)

  1. preceding; that comes before
    • 1377, Bernard de Gordon, Fleur de lis de medecine (a.k.a. lilium medicine):
      Fievre ethique vient sans fievre precedente
      Ethical[?] fever comes without a preceding fever