prestige

See also: Prestige

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French prestige (illusion, fascination, enchantment, prestige), from Latin praestigium (a delusion, an illusion). Despite the phonetic similarities and the old meaning of “delusion, illusion, trick”, the word has a different root than prestidigitator (conjurer) and prestidigitation.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /pɹɛsˈtiː(d)ʒ/, /pɹəˈstiː(d)ʒ/
  • (obsolete) IPA(key): /ˈpɹɛs.tɪdʒ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːʒ, -iːdʒ

NounEdit

prestige (usually uncountable, plural prestiges)

  1. The quality of how good the reputation of something or someone is, how favourably something or someone is regarded.
    Oxford has a university of very high prestige.
  2. (obsolete, often preceded by "the") Delusion; illusion; trick.
    • 1811, William Warburton, Richard Hurd, editor, The works of the Right Reverend William Warburton, D.D., Lord Bishop of Gloucester, volume the ninth, London: Luke Hansard & Sons, OCLC 7605701, page 121:
      That faith which, we are told, was founded on a rock, impregnable to the assaults of men and demons; to the sophisms of infidelity, and the prestiges of imposture!

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AdjectiveEdit

prestige (not comparable)

  1. (sociolinguistics, of a linguistic form) Regarded as relatively prestigious; often, considered the standard language or language variety, or a part of such a variety.
    • 1971, John Gumperz, “Formal and informal standards in Hindi regional language area”, in Language in Social Groups, Stanford: Stanford University Press, →ISBN, page 48:
      Furthermore there is in each area a well recognized standard, known by a single name, which although often linguistically distinct from local dialects, has served as the prestige form for some time.
    • 1981, Jerzy Rubach, Cyclic Phonology and Palatalization in Polish and English, Warsaw: Wydawnictwa Uniwersytetu Warszawskiego, OCLC 9557130, page 57:
      The 3rd person plural ending is phonetically [ow̃] or [om], depending on the dialect. However, [ow̃] is the prestige form.

VerbEdit

prestige (third-person singular simple present prestiges, present participle prestiging, simple past and past participle prestiged)

  1. (video games) To start over at an earlier point in a video game with some type of bonus or reward.
    • 2002 July 15, Mark Green, “help in creating prestige class: Sharpshooter”, in rec.games.frp.dnd, Usenet:
      This seriously depends on the prerequisites, but most chars will already have a +1 bow by the time they're thinking of prestiging - or will this stack with the equipment's magic?
    • 2010 December 3, Chris Stevens, “PWG 20101203 - The deja double”, in uk.games.video.misc, Usenet:
      I'm going to try to stop and move onto a different game once I've prestiged, but the credits/equipment buying arrangement will make prestiging much less of a crippling shock than in previous games, so I may well be stuck playing it for a long time to come.
    • 2013, Brent Kice, “Perceptions of Control: Open World Formats v. Online Multiplayer First Person Shooters”, in Matthew Wysocki, editor, Ctrl-Alt-Play: Essays on Control in Video Gaming, McFarland & Company, page 154:
      However, Treyarch crafts a narrative of leveling up when a player attempts to prestige. The player is stripped of most un-lockable game features and must re-earn them with the ability to repeat this process 15 times. Prestiging allows the empty narrative of online multiplayer first person shooters to continue on a much grander scale.
    • 2014 April 1, Man of Kent, “Monday, innit”, in uk.games.video.misc, Usenet:
      Reached level 50 and prestiged which I have never had the inclination to do in any game before.
    • 2018, Adam Kramarzewski; Ennio De Nucci, Practical Game Design, Packt, page 420:
      Prestiging itself is a concept popularized by Call of Duty: Modern Warfare, where players can reset their in-game progress after reaching the maximum experience level, and receive a cosmetic token in exchange.

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French prestige, from Latin praestigium.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

prestige n (uncountable)

  1. prestige

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Indonesian: prestise

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin praestigium.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

prestige m (plural prestiges)

  1. prestige
    de prestigeprestigious

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French prestige.

NounEdit

prestige c

  1. prestige

DeclensionEdit

Declension of prestige 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative prestige prestigen
Genitive prestiges prestigens

Related termsEdit