extravagant

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French and French extravagant, from Medieval Latin extravagans, past participle of extravagari (to wander beyond), from Latin extra (beyond) + vagari (to wander, stray).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɪkˈstɹævəɡənt/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

extravagant (comparative more extravagant, superlative most extravagant)

  1. Exceeding the bounds of something; roving; hence, foreign.
  2. Extreme; wild; excessive; unrestrained.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:excessive
    • 1711 September 14, Joseph Addison; Richard Steele, “MONDAY, September 3, 1711 [Julian calendar]”, in The Spectator, number 160; republished in Alexander Chalmers, editor, The Spectator; a New Edition, [], volume II, New York, N.Y.: D[aniel] Appleton & Company, 1853, OCLC 191120697:
      There appears something nobly wild and extravagant in great natural geniuses.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 1, in The China Governess[1]:
      The half-dozen pieces […] were painted white and carved with festoons of flowers, birds and cupids. […] The bed was the most extravagant piece. Its graceful cane halftester rose high towards the cornice and was so festooned in carved white wood that the effect was positively insecure, as if the great couch were trimmed with icing sugar.
    extravagant acts, praise, or abuse
  3. Exorbitant.
    • 2013 June 8, “Obama goes troll-hunting”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8839, page 55:
      According to this saga of intellectual-property misanthropy, these creatures [patent trolls] roam the business world, buying up patents and then using them to demand extravagant payouts from companies they accuse of infringing them. Often, their victims pay up rather than face the costs of a legal battle.
  4. Profuse in expenditure; prodigal; wasteful.
    an extravagant man
    extravagant expense
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Bancroft to this entry?)

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Medieval Latin extravagans

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

extravagant (feminine extravaganta, masculine plural extravagants, feminine plural extravagantes)

  1. extravagant

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Medieval Latin extravagans

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɛk.stʁa.va.ɡɑ̃/

AdjectiveEdit

extravagant (feminine singular extravagante, masculine plural extravagants, feminine plural extravagantes)

  1. extravagant

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French extravagant.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

extravagant (comparative extravaganter, superlative am extravagantesten)

  1. extravagant

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French extravagant.

AdjectiveEdit

extravagant m or n (feminine singular extravagantă, masculine plural extravaganți, feminine and neuter plural extravagante)

  1. extravagant

DeclensionEdit