EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Clipping of hurrah

InterjectionEdit

rah

  1. An exclamation of encouragement.
    • 2011, Kern Alexander, ‎M. David Alexander, American Public School Law (page 668)
      Not so very long ago, a row of docile cheerleaders would say, “rah, rah, rah, sis-boombah”—maybe a leg would kick up into the air, perhaps a jump under the cheerleader's own power.

NounEdit

rah (plural rahs)

  1. (Britain, informal) A person (especially a student) with a posh accent who looks down on those who are "common".
    • 2012, Helen Pidd, Letter from India: it's no easy matter being a woman looking for a decent drink in Delhi, The Guardian [1]
      I didn't need to make a mental note not to follow their advice: like every other pretentious foreigner from the gap year rahs to the retired yoga addicts, I had no intention of stepping into a shopping centre. I was going to discover the real India.

AdjectiveEdit

rah (comparative more rah, superlative most rah)

  1. (Britain, informal) Posh.

Etymology 2Edit

Clipping of rhatid

InterjectionEdit

rah

  1. (MLE) An expression of surprise.
  2. (MLE) An expression of admiration.
    • 2016, Wiley, quoted in This Is Grime by Hattie Collins and Olivia Rose, Hachette UK, page 145:
      Target bought[sic] the tape round, I listened to it and I was like, ‘Rah, this is sick, this kid is so sick’.
  3. (MLE) An expression of frustration or anger.

AnagramsEdit


MizoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Sino-Tibetan *b-ras (rice). Cognate found in Tibetan འབྲས ('bras).

NounEdit

rah

  1. fruit, berry
    rah tlanbird-traps consisting of a kind of fruit
  2. acorn, nut

VerbEdit

rah

  1. to bear fruit
    rah duhfor a tree to be fruitful
    rah ṭhato bear good fruit
    rah chhiato bear bad fruit

SomaliEdit

NounEdit

rah f

  1. frog