surprise

EnglishEdit

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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, from Middle French surprise (an overtake), from noun use of past participle of Old French surprendre (to overtake), from sur- (over) + prendre (to take), from Latin prendere, contracted from prehendere (to grasp, seize).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

surprise (plural surprises)

  1. Something not expected.
    • 2013, Daniel Taylor, Rickie Lambert’s debut goal gives England victory over Scotland (in The Guardian, 14 August 2013)[1]
      They had begun brightly but the opening goal was such a blow to their confidence it almost came as a surprise when Walcott, running through the inside-right channel, beat the offside trap and, checking back on to his left foot, turned a low shot beyond Allan McGregor in the Scotland goal.
    • 2012 September 7, Phil McNulty, “Moldova 0-5 England”, BBC Sport:
      England were graphically illustrating the huge gulf in class between the sides and it was no surprise when Lampard added the second just before the half hour. Steven Gerrard found his Liverpool team-mate Glen Johnson and Lampard arrived in the area with perfect timing to glide a header beyond Namasco.
    It was a surprise to find out I owed twice as much as I thought I did.
  2. (attributive) Unexpected.
    The surprise attack was devastating.
  3. The feeling that something unexpected has happened.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 20, The China Governess[2]:
      The story struck the depressingly familiar note with which true stories ring in the tried ears of experienced policemen. [] The second note, the high alarum, not so familiar and always important since it indicates the paramount sin in Man’s private calendar, took most of them by surprise although they had been well prepared.
    Imagine my surprise on learning I owed twice as much as I thought I did.
  4. (obsolete) A dish covered with a crust of raised pastry, but with no other contents.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of King to this entry?)

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

  • take by surprise

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

surprise (third-person singular simple present surprises, present participle surprising, simple past and past participle surprised)

  1. (transitive) To cause (someone) to feel unusually alarmed or delighted.
    It surprises me that I owe twice as much as I thought I did.
  2. (transitive) To do something to (a person) that they are not expecting, as a surprise.
    He doesn’t know that I’m in the country – I thought I’d turn up at his house and surprise him.
  3. (intransitive) To undergo or witness something unexpected.
    He doesn’t surprise easily.
  4. (intransitive) To cause surprise.
  5. (transitive) To attack unexpectedly.
  6. (transitive) To take unawares.

TranslationsEdit

(Can we verify(+) this sense?)

AdjectiveEdit

surprise (not comparable)

  1. Unexpected.
    • 1913, Robert Barr, chapter 4, Lord Stranleigh Abroad[3]:
      “I came down like a wolf on the fold, didn’t I ?  Why didn’t I telephone ?  Strategy, my dear boy, strategy. This is a surprise attack, and I’d no wish that the garrison, forewarned, should escape. …”

DutchEdit

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

EtymologyEdit

From French surprise.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

surprise f (plural surprises, diminutive surprisetje n)

  1. (Netherlands) A gift wrapped in an ingenious or creative manner. Often given anonymously during Sinterklaas celebrations in a similar way to secret Santa.

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From verb surprendre.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

surprise

  1. feminine form of surpris
    Je t’ai surprise en flagrant délit.

NounEdit

surprise f (plural surprises)

  1. surprise (something unexpected)
Last modified on 14 April 2014, at 21:19