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EnglishEdit

 
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Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Old French recordour, from Old French recordeor, from Medieval Latin recordātor, from Latin recordor (call to mind, remember, recollect), from re- (back, again) + cor (heart; mind).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

recorder (plural recorders)

  1. An apparatus for recording; a device which records.
  2. Agent noun of record; one who records.
  3. A judge in a municipal court.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English, from record (to practice (music)).

NounEdit

recorder (plural recorders)

  1. (music) A musical instrument of the woodwind family; a type of fipple flute, a simple internal duct flute.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle French recorder, from Old French recorder, from Vulgar Latin recordāre, alternative form of Latin recordārī, present active infinitive of recordor (call to mind, remember, recollect), from re- (back, again) + cor (heart; mind).

VerbEdit

recorder

  1. (obsolete) to say something repetitively in order to learn.
    As-tu recordé ta leçon?
ConjugationEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

re- +‎ corder.

VerbEdit

recorder

  1. to restring

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French recorder.

VerbEdit

recorder

  1. to record; to register; to make a record (of)
    recorder une histoire
    to make a record of a story

ConjugationEdit

  • Middle French conjugation varies from one text to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

DescendantsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin recordāre, from Latin recordārī, present active infinitive of recordor.

VerbEdit

recorder

  1. to record; to register
  2. to recall; to remember

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. The forms that would normally end in *-d, *-ds, *-dt are modified to t, z, t. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit