See also: Record, récord, and rècord

English edit

 
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Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English, borrowed from Old French record, from recorder. See record (verb).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

record (plural records)

  1. An item of information put into a temporary or permanent physical medium.
    The person had a record of the interview so she could review her notes.
    The tourist's photographs and the tape of the police call provide a record of the crime.
    • 2012 March-April, John T. Jost, “Social Justice: Is It in Our Nature (and Our Future)?”, in American Scientist[1], volume 100, number 2, archived from the original on 13 February 2012, page 162:
      He draws eclectically on studies of baboons, descriptive anthropological accounts of hunter-gatherer societies and, in a few cases, the fossil record.
  2. Any instance of a physical medium on which information was put for the purpose of preserving it and making it available for future reference.
    Synonym: log
    We have no record of you making this payment to us.
  3. Ellipsis of phonograph record: a disc, usually made from vinyl, on which sound is recorded and may be replayed on a phonograph.
    Synonyms: disc, phonograph record, vinyl
    I still like records better than CDs.
    • 2012, “Record Doctor”, performed by Saint Etienne:
      He's the record doctor / Tell him your woes / He'll reach in his bag / And he'll give you a dose
  4. (computing) A set of data relating to a single individual or item.
    Pull up the record on John Smith. What's his medical history?
  5. (programming) A data structure similar to a struct, in some programming languages such as C# and Java based on classes and designed for storing immutable data.
    Coordinate terms: struct, enumeration
    • 1989, Elliot B. Koffman, Pascal: Problem Solving and Program Design, Addison-Wesley, →ISBN, page 406:
      This chapter examines another data structure, the record (available in Pascal but not in all other high-level languages). Records make it easier to organize and represent information in Pascal, a major reason for the popularity of the Pascal []
    • 2020, Ian F. Darwin, Java Cookbook, O'Reilly Media, →ISBN, page 232:
      The new record type provides another solution. A record is a class-like construct for data classes, a restricted form of class like enums and annotations.
    • 2021, Joseph Albahari, C# 9.0 in a Nutshell, O'Reilly Media, →ISBN, page 210:
      A record is a special kind of class that's designed to work well with immutable (readonly) data.
  6. The most extreme known value of some variable, particularly that of an achievement in competitive events.
    The heat and humidity were both new records.
    The team set a new record for most points scored in a game.
    • 2023 April 5, “Network News: Conservatives accused of "rewarding Avanti's failure"”, in RAIL, number 980, page 6:
      "Avanti has literally broken records over the last six months for delays and cancellations, and the Conservatives' answer is to reward failure with millions more in taxpayer cash," said Labour Shadow Transport Secretary Louise Haigh.
Hyponyms edit
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit
  • Portuguese: recorde
Translations edit

Adjective edit

record (not comparable)

  1. (attributive) Enough to break previous records and set a new one; world-class; extreme.
    Synonyms: record-breaking, record-setting
    • 1952, C. S. Lewis, The Voyage of the Dawn Treader:
      "But it's far worse for me," said Edmund, "because you'll at least have a room of your own and I shall have to share a bedroom with that record stinker, Eustace."
Translations edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Middle English recorden (to repeat, to report), borrowed from Old French recorder (to get by heart), from Latin recordārī, present active infinitive of recordor (remember, call to mind), from re- (back, again) + cor (heart; mind).

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

record (third-person singular simple present records, present participle recording, simple past and past participle recorded)

  1. (transitive) To make a record of information.
    I wanted to record every detail of what happened, for the benefit of future generations.
    • 2012 September 7, Phil McNulty, “Moldova 0-5 England”, in BBC Sport[2]:
      The display and result must be placed in the context that was it was against a side that looked every bit their Fifa world ranking of 141 - but England completed the job with efficiency to record their biggest away win in 19 years.
  2. (transitive) To make an audio or video recording of.
    Within a week they had recorded both the song and the video for it.
    • 2014 June 29, Adam Sherwin, “UK cinemas ban Google glasses over piracy risk”, in The Independent[3]:
      However, the ability to record people without their knowledge, with the stroke of a finger over the spectacle frame or a voice command, has prompted privacy concerns.
  3. (transitive, law) To give legal status to by making an official public record.
    When the deed was recorded, we officially owned the house.
  4. (intransitive) To fix in a medium, usually in a tangible medium.
  5. (intransitive) To make an audio, video, or multimedia recording.
  6. (transitive, intransitive, obsolete) To repeat; to practice.
  7. (transitive, intransitive, obsolete) To sing or repeat a tune.
  8. (obsolete) To reflect; to ponder.
    • 1655, Thomas Fuller, “Section 3”, in James Nichols, editor, The Church History of Britain, [], new edition, volumes (please specify |volume=I to III), London: [] [James Nichols] for Thomas Tegg and Son, [], published 1837, →OCLC, book, page 204:
      [] he was [] carried to the Scaffold on the Tower-hill [] , himself praying all the way, and recording upon the words which he before had read.
      The spelling has been modernized.
Antonyms edit
  • (make a record of information): erase
  • (make an audio or video recording of): erase
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Anagrams edit

Catalan edit

Etymology edit

From recordar.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

record m (plural records)

  1. memory, recollection of events
  2. souvenir
  3. (in the plural) regards (greeting to pass on to another person)

See also edit

Further reading edit

Dutch edit

Etymology 1 edit

Unadapted borrowing from French record, from English record, from Old French record.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /rəˈkoːr/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: re‧cord

Noun edit

record n (plural records, diminutive recordje n)

  1. A record, a best achievement.
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from English record.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈrɛ.kɔrt/
  • Hyphenation: re‧cord

Noun edit

record m or n (plural records, diminutive recordje n)

  1. A record, something recorded on an electronic storage medium.
  2. A data point in a database.
  3. A vinyl record.

French edit

Etymology edit

Orthographic borrowing from English record, itself from Old French record.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

record m (plural records)

  1. record (most extreme known value of some achievement)
    Le record du saut en hauteur a été battu par Javier Sotomayor en 1993.
    The high jump record was beaten by Javier Sotomayor in 1993.

Adjective edit

record (invariable) (attributive)

  1. record, record-breaking, record-setting
  2. extreme
    Le Pakistan connaît, depuis la fin d’avril, une vague de chaleur record.
    Pakistan has known, since the end of April, a wave of record heat.

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Italian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English record.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

record m (invariable)

  1. record (achievement; computer data element)

Further reading edit

  • record in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Portuguese edit

Noun edit

record m (plural records)

  1. Alternative form of recorde

Adjective edit

record (invariable)

  1. Alternative form of recorde

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French record.

Noun edit

record n (plural recorduri)

  1. record (achievement)

Declension edit

Spanish edit

Noun edit

record m (plural records)

  1. Misspelling of récord.
  2. record

Welsh edit

Etymology edit

From English record.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

record f (plural recordiau, not mutable)

  1. record

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “record”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies