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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin rotundus (round), from Latin rota (wheel), from Proto-Indo-European *ret- (to run, to roll) [1]. Doublet of round, which arrived through Old French/Anglo-Norman.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

rotund (comparative rotunder, superlative rotundest)

  1. Having a round or spherical shape; circular; orbicular.
    • 1956, Delano Ames, chapter 23, in Crime out of Mind[1]:
      He was a plump little man and we had been walking uphill at a pace—set by him—far too rapid for his short legs. He breathed stertorously, and half the drops which glimmered on his rotund face were not rain but sweat.
  2. Having a round body shape; portly or plump; podgy.
  3. (of a sound) Full and rich; orotund; sonorous; full-toned.

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

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CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

rotund (feminine rotunda, masculine plural rotunds, feminine plural rotundes)

  1. emphatic
  2. complete, flat out, downright

RomanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin rotundus (round), possibly through a Vulgar Latin form retundus, especially in the case of the variant form, rătund, which was the original form (compare Spanish and Portuguese redondo, archaic Italian ritondo (standard rotondo), Occitan redond, Catalan redó (variant of standard rodó), French rond (Old French reont)). The current standard form of the word may simply be a natural evolution from the older form in southern Romania. [1]

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

rotund m or n (feminine singular rotundă, masculine plural rotunzi, feminine and neuter plural rotunde)

  1. round

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Romanian Explanatory Dictionary http://dexonline.ro/definitie/rotund