Open main menu

Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch *sigi, from Proto-Germanic *segaz.

NounEdit

sēge m

  1. victory, triumph

InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • seghe”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • sege (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French sege, siege, from Vulgar Latin *sēdicum, from sēdēs.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sege (plural seges or segen)

  1. A siege; an attack or assault on a walled city:
    1. A group of assailants in a siege.
    2. A retelling or recounting of a siege.
  2. A seat, especially that which indicates authority:
    1. A portable seat; a seat on the back of a mount.
    2. A location, especially somethings's usual location.
    3. (rare) Ones's position, office, or station.
    4. (rare) A capital or headquarters.
  3. An outhouse; a bathroom:
    1. (by extension) A latrine or privy; a hole or container for storing bodily waste
    2. (by extension) Defecation; the expulsion of one's feces.
  4. An ecclesiastical see; a bishopric.
  5. A group of herons; a perch used by herons.
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From sege (noun).

VerbEdit

sege

  1. Alternative form of segen

Etymology 3Edit

From Old English seċġ (sedge).

NounEdit

sege

  1. Alternative form of segge (sedge)

Etymology 4Edit

From Old English seċġ (man).

NounEdit

sege

  1. Alternative form of segge (man)