See also: SEG and -ség

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /sɛɡ/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛɡ

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English segge, from Old English secg (man, warrior, hero), from Proto-West Germanic *sagi, from Proto-Germanic *sagjaz (follower, retainer, warrior), from Proto-Indo-European *sekʷ- (to follow, accompany). Cognate with Norwegian segg, Icelandic seggur (bully).

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

seg (plural segs)

  1. (archaic) A man; warrior; hero.
  2. (Britain dialectal) A man; fellow.

Etymology 2Edit

Probably from the root of Latin secare (to cut).

NounEdit

seg (plural segs)

  1. (Britain, Scotland, dialect) A castrated bull.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for seg in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Etymology 3Edit

Clipping of segregation

NounEdit

seg (uncountable)

  1. (US prison slang) Segregation
    • 1988, July 15, “Albert Williams”, in Prison Drama[1]:
      [] when a prisoner is transferred or paroled or sent to "seg" (segregation) or hauled back into court, they don't ask if he's busy with a lead role in a play.

AdjectiveEdit

seg (not comparable)

  1. Designated for colored people
    Black members of the order were relegated to seg lodges.

Etymology 4Edit

NounEdit

seg (plural segs)

  1. A metal stud or plate fixed to the sole or heel of a shoe to prevent excessive wear.
    Synonym: blakey
  2. (dialect) A callus, an area of hardened skin.
Coordinate termsEdit

Etymology 5Edit

See sedge.

NounEdit

seg

  1. sedge
  2. gladen, or other species of Iris
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Prior to this entry?)

Etymology 6Edit

NounEdit

seg (plural segs)

  1. (broadcasting) Clipping of segment.
    • 1951, December 15, Billboard (page 6)
      The usual partisanship for bankrollers of radio segs is shown on TV stations.

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

VerbEdit

seg (present seg, present participle seggende, past participle geseg)

  1. Obsolete form of .

FaroeseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse sik, from Proto-Germanic *sek, from Proto-Indo-European *se.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

seg (accusative reflexive)

  1. oneself, himself, herself, itself, themselves

DeclensionEdit

Reflexive pronouns - Afturbent fornavn
Singular (eintal), Plural (fleirtal) 3. m, f, n
Nominative (hvørfall)
Accusative (hvønnfall) seg
Dative (hvørjumfall) sær
Genitive (hvørsfall) sín

ReferencesEdit

  • Höskuldur Thráinsson, Hjalmar P. Petersen, Jógvan í Lon Jacobsen, Zakaris Svabo Hansen: Faroese : An Overview and Reference Grammar. Tórshavn: Føroya Fróðskaparfelag, 2004 (p. ., 325 ff.)

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English seċġ (sedge).

NounEdit

seg

  1. Alternative form of segge (sedge)

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English seċġ (man).

NounEdit

seg

  1. Alternative form of segge (man)

Norwegian BokmålEdit

Etymology 1Edit

PronounEdit

seg - reflexive pronoun

  1. (with verb) oneself; itself; himself/herself
  2. (with verb) one, him, her, it, them
  3. (with verb) themselves
Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

seg

  1. simple past of sige

Norwegian NynorskEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse sik, from Proto-Germanic *sek (accusative of *se-). Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *swe- (self).

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

seg - reflexive pronoun

  1. (with verb) oneself; itself; himself/herself
  2. (with verb) one, him, her, it, them
  3. (with verb) themselves
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

sèg

  1. (non-standard since 1938) imperative of segja

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

seg

  1. imperative of sega

ReferencesEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

seg (comparative segare, superlative segast)

  1. tough
  2. capable of withstanding a lot of torsion without breaking
  3. chewy
  4. leathery
  5. slow-witted
  6. tardy
  7. rubbery

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of seg
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular seg segare segast
Neuter singular segt segare segast
Plural sega segare segast
Masculine plural3 sege segare segast
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 sege segare segaste
All sega segare segaste
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.
3) Dated or archaic

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


WestrobothnianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse sik, from Proto-Germanic *sek, from Proto-Indo-European *se.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

seg - reflexive pronoun

  1. (reflexive) accusative and dative third person reflexive pronoun meaning oneself (and also depending on context himself, herself, itself and themselves)
    tvill bórt i skogjen
    to get oneself lost in the forest
  2. (referring to the subject of the main clause) him, her, it, them
    haimfålke fik en til fåli ve si
    the home folks got him to accompany them
Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Singular of saaij (say).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

seg

  1. I, thou, he, she, it says