seigneur

See also: Seigneur

EnglishEdit

 
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle French seigneur, from Old French seignor. Doublet of senior, seignior, sire, and sir.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

seigneur (plural seigneurs)

  1. (historical) A French feudal lord; a noble.
    • 2002, Colin Jones, The Great Nation, Penguin 2003, p. 156:
      There was less and less love lost between peasants and seigneurs. The services which the latter had provided for the peasant community in the past had diminished in value.
  2. The hereditary feudal ruler of Sark.
    • 2012, Lauren Collins, The New Yorker, 29 Oct 2012:
      Beaumont lives on Sark, a small, autonomous island twenty-five miles off the coast of Normandy, with her husband, Michael, the island's seigneur.
  3. (Canada) A landowner in Canada; the holder of a seigneurie.

Coordinate termsEdit

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French seigneur, from Old French seignor (oblique form), from Latin seniōrem, accusative singular of senior (compare sire, derived from the nominative form). Doublet of senior.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /sɛ.ɲœʁ/, /se.ɲœʁ/
  • (file)

NounEdit

seigneur m (plural seigneurs, feminine seigneuresse or seigneuse)

  1. lord (aristocrat, man of high rank)
  2. lord (master)
  3. (Canada) seigneur (a landowner, holder of a seigneurie)

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French seignor.

NounEdit

seigneur m (plural seigneurs)

  1. lord
  2. sire (term of respect)

DescendantsEdit

  • English: seigneur
  • French: seigneur

Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

seigneur m (oblique plural seigneurs, nominative singular sire, nominative plural seigneur)

  1. Alternative form of seignor