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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old French servitude, from Latin servitūs, from Latin servus (slave).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

servitude (countable and uncountable, plural servitudes)

  1. The state of being a slave; slavery.
    • 1913, Elizabeth Kimball Kendall, A Wayfarer in China
      In spite of the importance of this route it remained until a few years ago very insecure. Overhung almost its entire length by the inaccessible fastnesses of Lololand, the passing caravans dared journey only with convoy, and even then were frequently overwhelmed by raiders from the hills, who carried off both trader and goods into the mountains, the former to lifelong servitude.
  2. (law) A qualified beneficial interest severed or fragmented from the ownership of an inferior property and attached to a superior property or to some person other than the owner; the most common form is an easement.
  3. (dated) Service rendered in the army or navy.
  4. (obsolete) Servants collectively.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin servitūdō, from Latin servus.

NounEdit

servitude f (plural servitudes)

  1. servitude, thralldom

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin servitus, servitutem, probably a borrowing.

NounEdit

servitude f (plural servitudes)

  1. servitude (the state of being a serf or slave)

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit