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See also: Shiv

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
A Soviet-era Russian shiv.

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

First attested 1915. From chive, chieve, chife, chiv (knife), from Romani chive, chiv, chivvomengro (knife, dagger, blade).[1][2][3][4]

PronunciationEdit

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NounEdit

shiv (plural shivs)

  1. A knife, especially a makeshift one fashioned from something not normally used as a weapon (like a plastic spoon or a toothbrush).
  2. A particular woody by-product of processing flax or hemp.

SynonymsEdit

  • (improvised stabbing weapon): shank (slang)

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

shiv (third-person singular simple present shivs, present participle shivving, simple past and past participle shivved)

  1. To stab someone with a shiv.
  2. (by extension) To stab someone with anything not normally used as a stabbing weapon.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ shiv” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2018, retrieved 6 July 2017: “"a razor," 1915, variant of chive, thieves' cant word for "knife" (1670s), of unknown origin.”.
  2. ^ shiv” in Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary
  3. ^ shiv” in Michael Agnes, editor-in-chief, Webster's New World College Dictionary, 4th edition, Cleveland, Oh.: Wiley, 2010, →ISBN; reproduced on the Collins English Dictionary, Glasgow: HarperCollins Publishers, retrieved 6 July 2017: “Word origin of 'shiv': earlier chiv, prob. < Romany chiv, blade”.
  4. ^ shiv” (US) / “shiv” (UK) in Oxford Dictionaries, Oxford University Press. "Probably from Romany chiv ‘blade’."

AnagramsEdit