EnglishEdit

NounEdit

mes

  1. plural of me
    If I travelled back in time to witness my own birth, would there be two mes?

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch mes, from Middle Dutch mets, mes, contraction of *metses, from Old Dutch *metisas, *metsas, from Proto-West Germanic *matisahs (food knife).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mes (plural messe)

  1. knife

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Zulu: umese

AlbanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Albanian *meTi, *meTśi-, from Proto-Indo-European *me-t/dhi (with, middle), ultimately from *medʰyo-. Cognate to Gothic 𐌼𐌹𐌸 (miþ, with). It might represent a devoiced variant of mez. A loan from Modern Greek μέσος (mésos, in the middle) is not excluded.

NounEdit

mes m (indefinite plural mese, definite singular mesi, definite plural meset)

  1. middle

DeclensionEdit

See alsoEdit


AragoneseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mensis.

NounEdit

mes m (plural meses)

  1. month

ReferencesEdit


AromanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mensis.

NounEdit

mes m (plural mesh)

  1. month

SynonymsEdit


AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mensis.

NounEdit

mes m (plural meses)

  1. month

Atong (India)Edit

EtymologyEdit

Cognate with Garo mes. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

NounEdit

mes

  1. sheep

ReferencesEdit


CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Occitan mes, from Latin mēnsis (month), from Proto-Indo-European *mḗh₁n̥s (moon, month). Compare French mois, Italian mese, Portuguese mês, Romansch mais, Spanish mes, Aromanian mes.

NounEdit

mes m (plural mesos)

  1. month

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Latin missus, past participle of mittere.

VerbEdit

mes

  1. past participle of metre

Etymology 3Edit

From Vulgar Latin mās, reduced form of Latin meās

DeterminerEdit

mes

  1. feminine plural of mon

DutchEdit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch mets, mes, contraction of *metses, from Old Dutch *metisas, *metsas, from Proto-West Germanic *matisahs (food knife).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /mɛs/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: mes
  • Rhymes: -ɛs

NounEdit

mes n (plural messen, diminutive mesje n)

  1. knife, cleaver
  2. (informal) blade

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Afrikaans: mes
  • Japanese: メス (mesu, medical knife)
  • Korean: 메스 (meseu, medical knife)

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French mes, from Latin meōs, meī and meās, meae.

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

mes pl (masculine mon, feminine ma)

  1. my (when referring to a plural noun)

Related termsEdit

Possessee
Singular Plural
Masculine Feminine
Possessor Singular First person mon1 ma mes
Second person ton1 ta tes
Third person son1 sa ses
Plural First person notre nos
Second person votre2 vos2
Third person leur leurs
1 Also used before feminine adjectives and nouns beginning with a vowel or mute h.
2 Also used as the polite singular form.

Further readingEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese mes, from Latin mensis.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mes m (plural meses)

  1. month

ReferencesEdit

  • mes” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • mes” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • mes” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • mes” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

GaroEdit

NounEdit

mes

  1. lamb

GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

mes

  1. Romanization of 𐌼𐌴𐍃

IndonesianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈmɛs]
  • Hyphenation: mès

Etymology 1Edit

From Dutch mess (mess), from English mess.

NounEdit

mès (first-person possessive mesku, second-person possessive mesmu, third-person possessive mesnya)

  1. mess (hall)

Etymology 2Edit

From English mesh.

NounEdit

mès (first-person possessive mesku, second-person possessive mesmu, third-person possessive mesnya)

  1. (engineering) mesh, structure or opening.

Etymology 3Edit

From Dutch mest (manure), from Middle Dutch mest, from Old Dutch *mist, from Proto-Germanic *mihstuz. Semantic loan from Dutch kunstmest (artificial fertilizer).

NounEdit

mès (first-person possessive mesku, second-person possessive mesmu, third-person possessive mesnya)

  1. (colloquial) artificial fertilizer.

Further readingEdit


KalashaEdit

NounEdit

mes

  1. table

LadinoEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

mes m (Latin spelling, Hebrew spelling מיס‎)

  1. month

LatgalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Balto-Slavic *mes. Cognates include Latvian mēs and Lithuanian mes.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /mʲæsʲ/
  • Hyphenation: mes

PronounEdit

mes

  1. we

DeclensionEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Nicole Nau (2011) A short grammar of Latgalian, München: LINCOM GmbH, →ISBN, page 35

LatvianEdit

PronounEdit

mes (personal, 1st person plural)

  1. (dialectal, archaic) we; alternative form of mēs

LithuanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Balto-Slavic *mes; compare Latvian mēs, Old Prussian mes, Proto-Slavic *my; akin to Old Armenian մեք (mekʿ). This form in m replaced Proto-Indo-European *wéy (we), probably after the 1st person plural verbal suffix -me. At the East-Baltic stage, the oblique forms were rebuilt by analogy with jūs. Compare the Old Prussian oblique forms nūsan, nūmans, and Old Church Slavonic насъ, намъ (nasŭ, namŭ), from *n̥s-, nos-.

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs audio files. If you have a microphone, please record some and upload them. (For audio required quickly, visit WT:APR.)

PronounEdit

mẽs

  1. we (first-person plural pronoun)

DeclensionEdit

See alsoEdit


OccitanEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Occitan mes, from Latin mensis (month). Compare French mois, Italian mese, Portuguese mês, Romansch main, Spanish mes.

NounEdit

mes m (plural meses)

  1. month

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

mes

  1. past participle of metre

Old FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin magis.

Alternative formsEdit

ConjunctionEdit

mes

  1. but
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin meōs, meī and meās, meae.

DeterminerEdit

mes m pl or f pl

  1. my (first-person plural possessive)
DescendantsEdit

Old OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mensis. Gallo-Romance cognate with Old French mois.

NounEdit

mes m (oblique plural mes, nominative singular mes, nominative plural mes)

  1. month

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old PrussianEdit

PronounEdit

mes

  1. we, the first person plural pronoun

PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

mes m (plural meses)

  1. Obsolete spelling of mês

RohingyaEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Bengali মেস (meś), ultimately from Persian [Term?].

NounEdit

mes (Hanifi spelling 𐴔𐴠𐴏𐴢)

  1. table

RomanschEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mes m (feminine mia)

  1. (possessive) my

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mensis (month), from Proto-Indo-European *mḗh₁n̥s (moon, month). Compare Catalan mes, Italian mese, Portuguese mês, Romansch mais.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmes/, [ˈmes]
  • (Murcia, Eastern Andalusia) IPA(key): [mɛː]
  • Hyphenation: mes

NounEdit

mes m (plural meses)

  1. month
    Mi mes favorito es enero.
    My favourite month is January.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mes c

  1. a tit (Latin name Parus), a small bird
  2. the metal frame of a backpack
  3. (colloquial, derogatory) a coward

DeclensionEdit

Declension of mes 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative mes mesen mesar mesarna
Genitive mes mesens mesars mesarnas

Related termsEdit


Zoogocho ZapotecEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish mesa, from Latin mēnsa.

NounEdit

mes

  1. table

ReferencesEdit

  • Long C., Rebecca; Cruz M., Sofronio (2000) Diccionario zapoteco de San Bartolomé Zoogocho, Oaxaca (Serie de vocabularios y diccionarios indígenas “Mariano Silva y Aceves”; 38)‎[1] (in Spanish), second electronic edition, Coyoacán, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, A.C., page 255