EnglishEdit

 
a few kitchen knives: chef's knife, bread knife, steak knife, and paring knife

Alternative formsEdit

  • (noun): knyfe (obsolete)
    • (plural): knifes (nonstandard)
  • (verb): knive (uncommon)

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English knyf, knif, from late Old English cnīf, from Old Norse knífr (compare Danish/Swedish/Norwegian kniv), North Frisian Knif from Proto-Germanic *knībaz (compare Low German Knief, Luxembourgish Knäip (penknife)), from *knīpaną (to pinch) (compare Dutch knijpen, Low German kniepen, Old High German gniffen), from Proto-Indo-European *gneybʰ- (compare Lithuanian gnýbti, žnýbti (to pinch), gnaibis (pinching)). Replaced Middle English sax (knife) from Old English seax (knife, dagger), and replaced Middle English coutel, qwetyll (knife) from Old French coutel (knife).

The verb knife is attested since the mid 1800s;[1] the variant knive is attested since 1733.

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: nīf, IPA(key): /naɪf/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪf

NounEdit

knife (plural knives)

  1. A utensil or a tool designed for cutting, consisting of a flat piece of hard material, usually steel or other metal (the blade), usually sharpened on one edge, attached to a handle. The blade may be pointed for piercing.
    • 2007, Scott Smith, The Ruins, page 273
      Jeff was bent low over the backboard, working with the knife, a steady sawing motion, his shirt soaked through with sweat.
  2. A weapon designed with the aforementioned specifications intended for slashing and/or stabbing and too short to be called a sword. A dagger.
  3. Any blade-like part in a tool or a machine designed for cutting, such as that of a chipper.

Derived termsEdit

Terms derived from knife (noun)

DescendantsEdit

  • Portuguese: naifa
  • Sranan Tongo: nefi

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

knife (third-person singular simple present knifes, present participle knifing, simple past and past participle knifed)

  1. (transitive) To cut with a knife.
  2. (transitive) To use a knife to injure or kill by stabbing, slashing, or otherwise using the sharp edge of the knife as a weapon.
    She was repeatedly knifed in the chest.
    • 1843, The Foreign Quarterly Review, volume 31, Treuttel and Würtz, Treuttel, Jun, and Richter, page 236:
      One day his sergeant began to cane him, on which, seizing his knife, he knifed the sergeant : he knifed the privates : he knifed until he was finally overpowered, and, brought before a court-martial, was condemned to fifteen years at the galleys.
    • 2012, Robert Biswas-Diener, The Courage Quotient: How Science Can Make You Braver, John Wiley & Sons, →ISBN, page 92:
      The plane has been hijacked. They've already knifed a guy.
    • 2015, Ross H. Spencer, The Fedorovich File, Diversion Books, →ISBN, page 211:
      Naw, they found him in the pissery of some gin mill near the Mohawk West terminal—he'd been knifed.
  3. (intransitive) To cut through as if with a knife.
  4. (transitive) To betray, especially in the context of a political slate.
  5. (transitive) To positively ignore, especially in order to denigrate. compare cut

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ knife”, in Merriam–Webster Online Dictionary.

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

knife

  1. Alternative form of knyf