EsperantoEdit

VerbEdit

sidus

  1. conditional of sidi

GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

sidus

  1. Romanization of 𐍃𐌹𐌳𐌿𐍃

IdoEdit

VerbEdit

sidus

  1. conditional of sidar

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Compare Ancient Greek σίδηρος (sídēros). Some derive this from Proto-Indo-European *sweid-, whence Latin sūdor, Greek ἱδρώς (hidrṓs), English shine.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sīdus n (genitive sīderis); third declension

  1. constellation, asterism
  2. a star
    Synonyms: astēr, astrum, stēlla
  3. (poetic) the night sky
  4. (figuratively) a season (of the year)

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun (neuter, imparisyllabic non-i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative sīdus sīdera
Genitive sīderis sīderum
Dative sīderī sīderibus
Accusative sīdus sīdera
Ablative sīdere sīderibus
Vocative sīdus sīdera

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • sidus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • sidus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • sidus in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • a star-light night: nox sideribus illustris
    • the fixed stars: sidera certis locis infixa
    • astronomy: astrologia (pure Latin sidera, caelestia)
    • an astronomer: spectator siderum, rerum caelestium or astrologus
  • sidus in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • sidus in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly