See also: soso, sósó, sôo, sosō, and so so

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English so so, from Old English swā swā, equivalent to so +‎ so. Compare Dutch zozo (so-so), German soso (so-so), Norwegian så som så (so-so).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈsəʊˌsəʊ/, /ˌsəʊˈsəʊ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -əʊ, -əʊsəʊ

AdjectiveEdit

so-so (not comparable)

  1. (informal) Neither good nor bad; tolerable, passable, indifferent.
    The dessert was pretty good, but the meal was so-so.
    • 1776, Oliver Goldsmith, The Haunch of Venison, a Poetical Epistle to Lord Clare
      In some Irish houses, where things are so-so, / One gammon of bacon hangs up for a show.
    • 1844, John Wilson, Essay on the Genius, and Character of Burns
      He [Burns] certainly wrote some so-so verses to the Tree of Liberty.

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AdverbEdit

so-so (not comparable)

  1. (informal) Neither very well nor very poorly.
    He performed so-so during the tryouts, and the coach was undecided whether to add him to the team or not.

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