mediocre

See also: médiocre and medíocre

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the late Middle English medioker, from the French médiocre, from the Middle French médiocre, from the Classical Latin mediocris ‎(in a middle state”, “of middle size”, “middling”, “moderate”, “ordinary), from medius ‎(middle) + ocris ‎(rugged mountain); compare mediocrely and mediocrity.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mediocre ‎(comparative more mediocre, superlative most mediocre)

  1. Having no peculiar or outstanding features; not extraordinary, special, exceptional, or great; of medium quality.
    I'm pretty good at tennis but only mediocre at racquetball.
    The mediocre teacher tells. The good teacher explains. The superior teacher demonstrates. The great teacher inspires. (William Arthur Ward)

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

mediocre ‎(plural mediocres)

  1. A person of minor significance, accomplishment or acclaim. Common and undistinguished person.

AntonymsEdit

  • (person of minor significance, accomplishment or acclaim): great

TranslationsEdit

External linksEdit


ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mediocre m, f ‎(masculine and feminine plural mediocri)

  1. mediocre, ordinary, middling
  2. second-rate, poor, shoddy

SynonymsEdit

NounEdit

mediocre m, f ‎(plural mediocri)

  1. mediocre person; mediocrity

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AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

PortugueseEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mediocre m, f ‎(plural mediocres, comparable)

  1. Obsolete spelling of medíocre

SpanishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mediocre m, f ‎(plural mediocres)

  1. mediocre

Related termsEdit

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