solitude

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French solitude; synchronically, sole +‎ -itude.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

solitude (countable and uncountable, plural solitudes)

  1. Aloneness; state of being alone or solitary, by oneself.
    Synonym: aloneness
    Antonym: intimacy
  2. A lonely or deserted place.
    • 1813, Lord Byron, Bride of Abydos, Canto 2, stanza 20:
      Mark where his carnage and his conquests cease!
      He makes a solitude, and calls it — peace.
    • 1975, Saul Bellow, Humboldt's Gift [Avon ed., 1976, p. 193]:
      Cranks like Rousseau made solitude glamorous, but sensible people agreed that it was really terrible.

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FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sōlitūdō, corresponding to sōlus (alone) + -tūdō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

solitude f (plural solitudes)

  1. solitude
    • 1969, Georges Moustaki (lyrics), “Ma solitude”, in Le Métèque, performed by Georges Moustaki:
      Elle m'a suivi çà et là / Aux quatre coins du monde / Non, je ne suis jamais seul / Avec ma solitude
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

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Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

solitude f (nominative singular solitude)

  1. solitude

DescendantsEdit

  • English: solitude
  • French: solitude

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sōlitūdō, corresponding to sōlus (alone) + -tūdō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

solitude f (plural solitudes)

  1. solitude

Related termsEdit