EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English spasme, from Old French spasme, from Latin spasmus, from Ancient Greek σπασμός (spasmós, spasm, convulsion), from σπάω (spáō, to draw out, pull out).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈspæz.əm/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æzəm

NounEdit

spasm (plural spasms)

  1. A sudden, involuntary contraction of a muscle, a group of muscles, or a hollow organ.
    Jessica went into spasms after eating a peanut.
  2. A violent, excruciating seizure of pain.
  3. A sudden and temporary burst of energy, activity, or emotion.
    • 1861, Anthony Trollope, Framley Parsonage
      He would use the simplest, plainest language, he said to himself over and over again; but it is not always easy to use simple, plain language,—by no means so easy as to mount on stilts, and to march along with sesquipedalian words, with pathos, spasms, and notes of interjection.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

spasm (third-person singular simple present spasms, present participle spasming, simple past and past participle spasmed)

  1. To produce and undergo a spasm or series of spasms.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French spasme.

NounEdit

spasm n (plural spasme)

  1. spasm

DeclensionEdit


SwedishEdit

 
Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sv

EtymologyEdit

From Old French spasme, from Latin spasmus, from Ancient Greek σπασμός (spasmós).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈspasm/, [ˈspasːm]

NounEdit

spasm c

  1. spasm

DeclensionEdit

Declension of spasm 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative spasm spasmen spasmer spasmerna
Genitive spasms spasmens spasmers spasmernas

ReferencesEdit