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Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Modern Latin, from Ancient Greek ἰώ (iṓ, Io).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

io (plural ios)

  1. A type of moth, the io moth.
    • 1936, Paul Griswold Howes, Hand book for the curious
      These lines appear to serve as roadways or guides to any stragglers that may have hung back for some reason known only to an io.

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin; compare Ancient Greek ἰώ (iṓ, oh!).

InterjectionEdit

io

  1. An exclamation of joy or triumph.
    • 1913, Crowley, Aleister, “Hymn To Pan”, in Book 4[1], University of California Libraries, Magick in Theory and Practice:
      Do as thou wilt, as a great god can,
      O Pan! Io Pan!
      Io Pan! Io Pan Pan! I am awake
      In the grip of the snake.

AnagramsEdit


AromanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *eo, from Latin ego, from Proto-Italic *egō, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂. Compare Romanian eu.

PronounEdit

io

  1. (first-person singular pronoun) I
  2. me

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit


ChuukeseEdit

PronounEdit

io

  1. who

DutchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin io, from Ancient Greek ἰώ (iṓ).

InterjectionEdit

io

  1. (dated) io (exclamation of triumph)

Further readingEdit


EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From i- (indeterminate correlative prefix) +‎ -o (correlative suffix of objects).

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

io (plural ioj, accusative singular ion, accusative plural iojn)

  1. something (indeterminate correlative of objects)

Derived termsEdit


InterlinguaEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

io

  1. I
    Io te ama.
    I love you.

Istro-RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *eo (compare Romanian eu and Italian io); from Latin ego, from Proto-Italic *egō, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂.

PronounEdit

io (first-person singular, plural noi)

  1. I

DeclensionEdit

nominative io
accusative stressed mire
unstressed me (m')
dative stressed mi
unstressed âm
genitive masc. sg. meu/mev
fem. sg. me
masc. pl. meľ
fem. pl. mele

ItalianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • jo (obsolete)

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *eo, from Latin ego (I), from Proto-Italic *egō, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂. Near cognates include French je, Portuguese eu, Romanian eu, and Spanish yo.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

io (personal, first person, possessive mio)

  1. I, the first person

InflectionEdit

subject io
object mi
prepositional me
reflexive mi

See alsoEdit

  • meco (with me)
  • noi (we (plural))

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

io

  1. Rōmaji transcription of いお

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Echoic; compare Greek ἰώ (iṓ), or English yo.

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

  1. An exclamation of joy or pain, or for getting one's attention.

ReferencesEdit

  • io in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • io in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • io” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • io in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[2]
  • io in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • io in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

NeapolitanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *eo, from Latin ego. Compare Italian io.

PronounEdit

io

  1. I, the first-person singular nominative pronoun

Coordinate termsEdit

Number Person Nominative Accusative Dative Reflexive Possessive Prepositional
singular first-person io (i') me mìo, mìa, mieje, meje me, méne
second-person, familiar tu te tùjo, tòja, tùoje, tòje te, téne
second-person, formal vuje ve vuósto, vósta, vuóste, vóste vuje
third-person, masculine ìsso 'o, 'u (lo, lu) 'i, 'e (li, le) se sùjo, sòja, sùoje, sòje ìsso
third-person, feminine éssa 'a (la) 'e (le) éssa
plural first-person nuje ce nuósto, nòsta, nuóste, nòste nuje
second-person, plural vuje ve vuósto, vòsta, vuóste, vòste vuje
third-person, masculine ìsse 'i, 'e (li, le) llòro se llòro (invariable) llòro
third-person, feminine llòro 'e (le)

Old DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *aiwaz.

Alternate spellingEdit

AdverbEdit

io

  1. always, every time, continuously
    • 1981 November 23, Quak, Arend, chapter 1, in Die altmittel- und altniederfränkischen Psalmen und Glossen. Nach den Handschriften und Erstdrucken neu herausgegeben. [The Old Middle and Old Lower Franconian Psalms and Glosses. Republished after the manuscripts and original publications.] (Amsterdamer Publikationen zur Sprache und Literatur; 47)[3] (in German), Amsterdam: Rodopi, ISBN 9789062038732, page 69:
      Duncla uuerthin ougon iro that sia ne gesian in rukgi iro io an crumbe.
      May their eyes be blinded so they (can) not see, and may their back keep getting bent!
    • 1981 November 23, Quak, Arend, chapter 1, in Die altmittel- und altniederfränkischen Psalmen und Glossen. Nach den Handschriften und Erstdrucken neu herausgegeben. [The Old Middle and Old Lower Franconian Psalms and Glosses. Republished after the manuscripts and original publications.] (Amsterdamer Publikationen zur Sprache und Literatur; 47)[4] (in German), Amsterdam: Rodopi, ISBN 9789062038732, page 71:
      An thi sang min io.
      For you is always my song.
  2. ever, at some point, sometime
    • 1971 November 23, Willy Sanders, editor, (Expositio) Willerammi Eberspergensis abbatis in canticis canticorum. Die Leidener Handschrift. (Kleine deutsche Prosadenkmäler des Mittelalters; 9)[5] (in Blend of Old High German and Latin), München: Wilhelm Fink, page 52:
      So wer ouch thurgh godes willan thiro wereld arbeyde muothe, wie magh her ie ze meeron ruowan cuman, thanne thaz her uollecume 'ad fontem totius boni'?
      And whoever by God's will is tired by the burdens of the world, how can he ever attain peace better than that he reaches the source of all good?

Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *aiwaz, whence also Old Norse ei

AdverbEdit

io

  1. always