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See also: Stank

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: stăngk, IPA(key): /stæŋk/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æŋk

Etymology 1Edit

VerbEdit

stank

  1. simple past tense of stink

AdjectiveEdit

stank (not comparable)

  1. (African American Vernacular, slang, derogatory) Foul-smelling, stinking, unclean.
    • 2002, Tasha C. Miller, Assout: Incoherent Thoughts and Poems of an Unemployed Black Girl (page 11)
      Fishy, pussy funky elevator / Pissy, broke ass project elevator / Old baby piss, stank ass horse, cat piss smelling funky hot ass elevator / I'm not climbing no 17 flights []
    • 2003, Tariq Nasheed, Play or be played (page 124)
      This is why most top-notch women can't stand stank hoes. Classy women have more contempt for these women than men do.
    • 2010, R. Scott, Nine Months and a Year Later... (page 31)
      He wants my love; he wants the love from here and just what's between your stank-ass legs.

Etymology 2Edit

French estanc, (French étang), from Latin stagnum (a pool). Compare stagnant, stagnate.

NounEdit

stank (plural stanks)

  1. (Britain, dialectal) Water retained by an embankment; a pool of water.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Robert of Brunne to this entry?)
  2. (Britain, dialectal) A dam or mound to stop water.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Old French estanc, or Italian stanco. See stanch (adjective).

AdjectiveEdit

stank (comparative more stank, superlative most stank)

  1. (obsolete) weak; worn out
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)

Etymology 4Edit

Compare Swedish word, meaning "to pant".

VerbEdit

stank (third-person singular simple present stanks, present participle stanking, simple past and past participle stanked)

  1. (obsolete, Britain, dialectal) To sigh.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for stank in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit


BretonEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old French estanc.

NounEdit

stank m

  1. pond

DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

stank c (singular definite stanken, plural indefinite stanke)

  1. stench

DeclensionEdit

VerbEdit

stank

  1. past tense of stinke

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch stanc, from Old Dutch stank, from Proto-Germanic *stankwaz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

stank m (plural stanken, diminutive stankje n)

  1. stench

GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

stank

  1. First-person singular preterite of stinken.
  2. Third-person singular preterite of stinken.

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Low German stank

NounEdit

stank m (definite singular stanken, indefinite plural stanker, definite plural stankene)

  1. stench, stink

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Low German stank

NounEdit

stank m (definite singular stanken, indefinite plural stankar, definite plural stankane)

  1. stench, stink

ReferencesEdit


Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *stankwaz, whence also Old English stenċ.

NounEdit

stank m

  1. smell

SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

stank c

  1. stink, stench (a bad smell)
    • 1938, Ludvig Nordström, Lort-Sverige
      Denna stank hade nämligen samma underliga egenskap som liklukt att så att säga smyga sig fram och liksom långsamt, gradvis underminera luften.
      "This stench had the same strange quality as the smell of corpses, that is so to say sneaked up on you and kind of slowly, gradually undermine the air."

DeclensionEdit

Declension of stank 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative stank stanken stanker stankerna
Genitive stanks stankens stankers stankernas

VerbEdit

stank

  1. past tense of stinka.