Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English storen, *sturien, from Old English *storian, variant of styrian ‎(to stir, move), from Proto-Germanic *sturōną ‎(to turn, disturb), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)twer-, *(s)tur- ‎(to rotate, twirl, swirl, move). Cognate with Dutch storen ‎(to disturb), Middle Low German stören ‎(to stir), German stören ‎(to disturb), German dialectal sturen ‎(to poke, root). Non-Germanic cognates include Albanian shtir ‎(to ford, wade across). See stir.

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

stoor ‎(third-person singular simple present stoors, present participle stooring, simple past and past participle stoored)

  1. (intransitive, Britain dialectal) To move; stir.
  2. (intransitive, Britain dialectal) To move actively; keep stirring.
  3. (intransitive, Britain dialectal) To rise up in clouds, as smoke, dust, etc.
  4. (transitive, Britain dialectal) To stir up, as liquor.
  5. (transitive, Britain dialectal) To pour; pour leisurely out of any vessel held high.
  6. (transitive, Britain dialectal) To sprinkle.

NounEdit

stoor ‎(plural stoors)

  1. (Britain dialectal) Stir; bustle; agitation; contention.
  2. (Britain dialectal) A gush of water.
  3. (Britain dialectal) Spray.
  4. (Britain dialectal) A sufficient quanity of yeast for brewing.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See stour.

AdjectiveEdit

stoor ‎(comparative stoorer or more stoor, superlative stoorest or most stoor)

  1. Alternative form of stour
Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

stoor

  1. first-person singular present indicative of storen
  2. imperative of storen

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

stoor

  1. Alternative spelling of stour (large)
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