stoor

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English stoor, stour (large, powerful), from Old English stōr (large, great, strong, violent), from Proto-Germanic *stōraz, *stōrijaz (great, big, strong), from Proto-Indo-European *stār-, *stōr- (big, thick, old). Akin to Scots stour (tall, large, great, stout), Eastern Frisian stor (great, many), Low German stur (large), Dutch stoer (tough, sturdy), Danish and Swedish stor (large, great), Icelandic stór (large, tall), Polish stary (old, ancient). Compare also steer.

Alternative formsEdit

  • stoore, stoure, stowre, stuir, stur, sture, sturry

AdjectiveEdit

stoor (comparative stoorer or more stoor, superlative stoorest or most stoor)

  1. (Now chiefly dialectal) Great; large; strong; mighty.
    O stronge lady stoor, what doest thou? — Chaucer.
  2. (Now chiefly dialectal) Stiff; hard; harsh.
  3. (Now chiefly dialectal, of people) Austere; harsh; severe; violent; turbulent.
  4. (Now chiefly dialectal, of the voice) Harsh; deep-toned.
Derived termsEdit
  • stoorness

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English storen, *sturien, from Old English *storian, variant of styrian (to stir, move), from Proto-Germanic *sturōną (to turn, disturb), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)twer-, *(s)tur- (to rotate, twirl, swirl, move). Cognate with Dutch storen (to disturb), Middle Low German stören (to stir), German stören (to disturb), German dialectal sturen (to poke, root). Non-Germanic cognate include Albanian shtir (to ford, wade across). See stir.

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

stoor (third-person singular simple present stoors, present participle stooring, simple past and past participle stoored)

  1. (intransitive, UK dialectal) To move; stir.
  2. (intransitive, UK dialectal) To move actively; keep stirring.
  3. (intransitive, UK dialectal) To rise up in clouds, as smoke, dust, etc.
  4. (transitive, UK dialectal) To stir up, as liquor.
  5. (transitive, UK dialectal) To pour; pour leisurely out of any vessel held high.
  6. (transitive, UK dialectal) To sprinkle.

NounEdit

stoor (plural stoors)

  1. (UK dialectal) Stir; bustle; agitation; contention.
  2. (UK dialectal) Dust in motion, hence also dust at rest.
  3. (UK dialectal) A gush of water.
  4. (UK dialectal) Spray.
  5. (UK dialectal) A sufficient quanitiy of yeast for brewing.
Derived termsEdit
  • stoorey
  • stoory

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

stoor

  1. first-person singular present indicative of storen
  2. imperative of storen

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

stoor

  1. Alternative spelling of stour (large)
Last modified on 30 March 2014, at 12:58