See also: poür

English edit

 
Ice tea poured into a glass

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English pouren (to pour), of uncertain origin. Likely to be of Celtic origin, from Celtic base *purr- (to jerk, throw (water)), akin to Welsh bwrw (to cast, strike, rain), Scottish Gaelic purr (to push, thrust, urge, drive), Irish purraim (I push, I jerk). Compare also the rare Dutch pouren (to pour).

Displaced Middle English schenchen, Middle English schenken (to pour) (from Old English sċenċan (to pour out), whence dialectal English shink, and Old Norse skenkja, whence dialectal English skink, and akin to Dutch schenken (to pour; to gift)), Middle English ȝeoten, Middle English yetten (to pour) (from Old English ġēotan (to pour) and akin to German gießen (to pour)), Middle English birlen (to pour, serve drink to) (from Old English byrelian (to pour, serve drink to)), Middle English hellen (to pour, pour out) (from Old Norse hella (to pour out, incline)). Largely displaced English teem, from Middle English temen (to pour out, empty) (from Old Norse tœma (to pour out, empty)).

Verb edit

pour (third-person singular simple present pours, present participle pouring, simple past and past participle poured)

  1. (transitive) To cause (liquid, or liquid-like substance) to flow in a stream, either out of a container or into it.
    pour water from a jug
    pour wine into a decanter
    to pour oil onto chips
    to pour out sand or dust.
  2. (transitive, figurative) To send out as in a stream or a flood; to cause (an emotion) to come out; to cause to escape.
    My teacher poured scorn on my attempts at writing.
  3. (transitive) To send forth from, as in a stream; to discharge uninterruptedly.
  4. (intransitive) To flow, pass or issue in a stream; to fall continuously and abundantly.
    the rain poured down.
  5. (impersonal) To rain hard.
    Synonym: (originally Northern England, Scotland, archaic) spate
    It's pouring outside.
  6. (intransitive) Of a beverage, to be on tap or otherwise available for serving to customers.
  7. (intransitive) To move in a throng, as a crowd.
    The people poured out of the theater.
    • 1716, John Gay, Trivia: Or, The Art of Walking the Streets of London:
      In the rude throng pour on with furious pace.
    • 1964 June 16, “All Eyes On Lema At U.S. Open This Week”, in The Indianapolis Star, volume 62, number 11, Indianapolis, Ind., page 22:
      The bluebloods of golf began pouring into the sweltering nation’s capital yesterday for the 64th U.S. Open championship, and the hottest topic was not Arnold Palmer or Jack Nicklaus, but Champagne Tony Lema.
    • 2011 January 8, Chris Bevan, “Arsenal 1-1 Leeds”, in BBC:
      In a breathless finish Arsenal poured forward looking for a winner but Leeds held out for a deserved replay after Bendtner wastefully fired wide and Schmeichel acrobatically kept out Denilson's rasping effort
Synonyms edit
Derived terms edit
Terms derived from pour (verb)
Translations edit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Noun edit

pour (plural pours)

  1. The act of pouring.
    The bartender's inexpert pour left me with a pint of beer that was half foam.
  2. Something, or an amount, poured.
    • 2003, John Brian Newman, B. S. Choo, Advanced concrete technology: Volume 2:
      Over this time period, the first concrete pour has not only lost workability but has started to set so that it is no longer affected by the action of a vibrator.
    • 2023 June 14, “Network News: Concrete for Old Oak Common - and consent for Curzon Street viaduct”, in RAIL, number 985, page 22:
      HS2 Ltd has completed the first base-slab concrete pour at the western end of Old Oak Common station.
  3. (colloquial) A downpour, or flood of precipitation.
    • 1831, Susan Ferrier, Destiny; or, the Chief's Daughter[1], page 84:
      Then, as if to give the lie to the offensive insinuation, he mounted his horse, and rode home ten miles in a pour of rain, without a great coat or umbrella.
    • 1953, Samuel Beckett, Watt, 1st American edition, New York, N.Y.: Grove Press, published 1959, →OCLC:
      But then one of Mr. Knott's men would have had to put on his coat and hat and turn out, as likely as not in the pitch dark, and in torrents of rain in all probability, and grope his way in the dark in the pours of rain, with the pot of food in his hand, a wretched and ridiculous figure, to where the dog lay.
Translations edit

Etymology 2 edit

Verb edit

pour

  1. Misspelling of pore.

References edit

  1. ^ Pour” in John Walker, A Critical Pronouncing Dictionary [] , London: Sold by G. G. J. and J. Robinſon, Paternoſter Row; and T. Cadell, in the Strand, 1791, →OCLC, page 402.

See also edit

Anagrams edit

Alemannic German edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Middle High German būre, gibūre, from Old High German gibūro, from būr (peasant). Cognate with German Bauer, Dutch buur, English bower.

Noun edit

pour m

  1. (Issime) farmer

References edit

French edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Middle French pour, from Old French por, pur, from Late Latin pōr, from Latin prō.

Pronunciation edit

Preposition edit

pour

  1. for (meant for, intended for) (followed by a noun or pronoun)
    J’ai un cadeau pour toi.
    I've got a gift for you.
  2. for (in support of)
    Pourquoi voter pour lui ?
    Why did you vote for him?
  3. for (as a consequence for)
    Il faut le punir pour ses crimes.
    He must be punished for his crimes.
  4. for (an intended destination)
    Sébastien est parti pour Londres.
    Sébastien left for London.
  5. to (to bring about an intended result) (followed by a verb in the infinitive)
    Je veux chanter pour te faire revenir.
    I want to sing to make you come back.
    • 2021, Angèle, Démons:
      Comment faire pour tuer mes démons ?
      How to kill my demons?
  6. for, to (according to)
    Pour moi, ce film est trop irréaliste.
    For me, this film is too unrealistic.

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Middle French edit

Etymology edit

From Old French por, pur.

Preposition edit

pour

  1. for (indicates an intended aim or recipient)
    • 1488, Jean Dupré, Lancelot du Lac, page 41:
      Dieu le scet que ie ne le faisoye se non pour bien & pour Dieu & pour franchise avoir
      God knows that I did for good, for God and to have freedom

Descendants edit

  • French: pour

Norman edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old French por, from Late Latin pōr, from Latin prō.

Preposition edit

pour

  1. (Guernsey) for
  2. (Guernsey) in order to

Romansch edit

Alternative forms edit

  • pur (peasant, farmer, Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Puter)
  • paur (Vallader)
  • pur (pawn, Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Puter, Vallader)

Etymology edit

Of Germanic origin, cognate with German Bauer, Dutch boer.

Noun edit

pour m (plural pours)

  1. (Surmiran) peasant, farmer
  2. (Surmiran, chess) pawn