EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English shoppe, schoppe, from Old English sċeoppa, sċoppa (shed; booth; stall; shop), from Proto-Germanic *skupp-, *skup- (barn, shed), from Proto-Indo-European *skub-, *skup- (to bend, bow, curve, vault). Cognate with Dutch schop (spade, kick), German Schuppen (shed), German Schober (barn), French échoppe (booth, shop) (< Germanic).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ʃɒp/
  • (US) enPR: shäp, IPA(key): /ʃɑp/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɒp

NounEdit

shop (countable and uncountable, plural shops)

  1. An establishment that sells goods or services to the public; originally only a physical location, but now a virtual establishment as well.
    • (Can we date this quote by Cowper and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      From shop to shop / Wandering, and littering with unfolded silks / The polished counter.
  2. A place where things are manufactured or crafted; a workshop.
  3. A large garage where vehicle mechanics work.
  4. Workplace; office. Used mainly in expressions such as shop talk, closed shop and shop floor.
  5. A variety of classes taught in junior or senior high school that teach vocational skill.
  6. An establishment where a barber or beautician works.
    a barber shop
  7. An act of shopping, especially routine shopping for food and other domestic supplies.
    This is where I do my weekly shop.
  8. (figuratively, uncountable) Discussion of business or professional affairs.
    • 1917, South African Chemical Institute, Proceedings, page 28:
      What struck me about the occasion was the quiet though cheerful tone of the gathering, the restraint, noticeable also in the very few speeches. Chemistry was taboo, by common consent — no " shop " allowed.
    • 1919, Virginia Woolf, Night and Day:
      But Mary cut her short.
      "We don't allow shop at tea, Sally," she said firmly.
    • 1953, Winston Churchill, “Strain and Suspense”, in The Second World War, page 619:
      Nothing but shop was ever talked on any of these occasions. I am sure these close relationships were necessary for the conduct of the war, and I could not have grasped the whole position without them.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

VerbEdit

shop (third-person singular simple present shops, present participle shopping, simple past and past participle shopped)

  1. (intransitive) To visit stores or shops to browse or explore merchandise, especially with the intention of buying such merchandise.
    I went shopping early before the Christmas rush.
    He’s shopping for clothes.
  2. (transitive) To purchase products from (a range or catalogue, etc.).
    Shop our new arrivals.
    • 1988, Sylvia Harney, Married beyond recognition: a humorous look at marriage (page 90)
      You fantasized about having unhurried afternoons before the baby arrived to leisurely shop your favorite boutiques. Then the first crash hits — you no longer have the money to shop your favorite boutiques.
  3. (transitive, slang, chiefly Britain) To report the criminal activities or whereabouts of someone to an authority.
    He shopped his mates in to the police.
  4. (transitive, slang, chiefly Britain) To imprison.
  5. (transitive, Internet slang) To photoshop; to digitally edit a picture or photograph.

SynonymsEdit

  • (to report a criminal to authority): grass up (slang)

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

InterjectionEdit

shop

  1. (dated) Used to attract the services of a shop assistant

Further readingEdit

  • shop at OneLook Dictionary Search

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English shop.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

shop m (plural shops, diminutive shopje n)

  1. shop
    Synonym: winkel

Derived termsEdit


FinnishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English shop.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈʃop/, [ˈʃo̞p]

NounEdit

shop

  1. (Anglism) Alternative form of shoppi (establishment that sells goods or services to the public).

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of shop (Kotus type 5/risti, no gradation)
nominative shop shopit
genitive shopin shopien
partitive shopia shopeja
illative shopiin shopeihin
singular plural
nominative shop shopit
accusative nom. shop shopit
gen. shopin
genitive shopin shopien
partitive shopia shopeja
inessive shopissa shopeissa
elative shopista shopeista
illative shopiin shopeihin
adessive shopilla shopeilla
ablative shopilta shopeilta
allative shopille shopeille
essive shopina shopeina
translative shopiksi shopeiksi
instructive shopein
abessive shopitta shopeitta
comitative shopeineen
Possessive forms of shop (type risti)
possessor singular plural
1st person shopini shopimme
2nd person shopisi shopinne
3rd person shopinsa