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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Back-formation from sulky, of uncertain origin. Probably from Middle English *sulke, *solke (attested in solcennesse (idleness; laziness), from Old English āsolcennys (idelness; slothfulness; sluggishness; laziness), from Old English āsolcen (sulky, languid), from past participle of āseolcan (be slow; be weak or slothful; languish), from Proto-Germanic *selkaną (to fall in drops; dribble; droop).

NounEdit

sulk (plural sulks)

  1. A state of sulking.
    Leo has been in a sulk all morning.

VerbEdit

sulk (third-person singular simple present sulks, present participle sulking, simple past and past participle sulked)

  1. (intransitive) to express ill humor or offence by remaining sullenly silent or withdrawn.
SynonymsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Latin sulcus.

NounEdit

sulk (plural sulks)

  1. A furrow.

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit