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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /swaɪn/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪn

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English swine, swin, from Old English swīn, from Proto-Germanic *swīną, from an adjectival form of Proto-Indo-European *suH- (pig), equivalent to sow +‎ -en. Related to West Frisian swyn, Low German Swien, Dutch zwijn, German Schwein, Danish svin, and more distantly to Polish świnia, Russian свинья́ (svinʹjá), Latin sūinus, Latin sūs, Ancient Greek ὗς (hûs), Persian خوک(xuk). See also sow.

NounEdit

swine (plural swine or swines)

  1. (plural swine) Any of various omnivorous, even-toed ungulates of the family Suidae.
  2. (derogatory) A contemptible person (plural swines).
  3. (slang, derogatory) A police officer; a "pig".
  4. (slang, derogatory) Something difficult or awkward; a pain.
    That old car is a swine to manoeuvre.
Derived termsEdit
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Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

swine

  1. (archaic) plural of sow

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English swīn, from Proto-Germanic *swīną.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

swine (plural swines)

  1. A pig, hog or swine.
    • a. 1382, John Wycliffe, “Matheu 7:6”, in Wycliffe's Bible:
      Nile ȝe ȝyue hooli thing to houndis, nethir caſte ȝe ȝoure margaritis bifore ſwyne, leſt perauenture thei defoulen hem with her feet, and the houndis be turned, and al to-tere ȝou.
      You shouldn't give holy things to dogs or throw your pearls towards swine, in case they stomp on them with their feet or the dogs turn around and rip you apart.
  2. The meat of swine or pigs; pork.
  3. (colloquial) A disgraceful individual.

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DescendantsEdit

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