See also: Sus, SUS, sús, süs, šus, -sus, sus-, sus', Sus., šūs, and Suś

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Clipping of suspicion.

NounEdit

sus (uncountable)

  1. (UK, informal) Suspicion (in terms of a sus law).
    • 2002, Simon James, British Government: A Reader in Policy Making (page 84)
      The committee [] said ‘sus’ had acquired a symbolic significance out of all proportion to its significance as a criminal charge.

Etymology 2Edit

Clipping of suspicious.

AdjectiveEdit

sus (comparative more sus, superlative most sus)

  1. (slang) Suspicious; having suspicions or questions.
    • 2010, Olwyn Conrau, The Importance of Being Cool[1], Carindale: Glass House Brooks, page 134:
      Even my lame psychic ability told me he'd be pretty sus if he found me pissing on in the lounge room on a week night.
    • 2015, Peter King, The Weaving[2], Wellington: Peter King Publishing:
      Everyone had been a bit sus about Mrs Jones and Lana Vilenskaya, so it wasn't surprising that Mrs Jones stood to speak.
    • 2018, Ron Chinchen, Scent of the Beast[3], Bloomington: Xlibris:
      I'm still really sus about those crocs we found in the drains.
  2. (slang) Suspicious; raising suspicions, causing people to have suspicions.
    • 1972, Frank Norman, The lives of Frank Norman: told in extracts from his autobiographical books Banana boy, Stand on me, Bang to rights, The guntz:
      Why this should be I will never know except I might be a pretty sus looking geezer or something. They took about six of us who were in the cafe down the nick and dubbed us up in separate peters. After a long while these two bogies came into ...

Etymology 3Edit

Clipping of suspended.

AdjectiveEdit

sus (not comparable)

  1. (music) Abbreviation of suspended.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch zus, shortening of zuster. Equivalent to a shortening of suster.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sus (plural susse, diminutive sussie)

  1. sister (female sibling)
    Synonym: suster

Related termsEdit


Alemannic GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German sus.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

sus

  1. otherwise
    • (Can we clean up(+) this sense?)
      1969, Archives suisses des traditions populaires[4], Schweizerische Gesellschaft für Volkskunde., LCCN 25014152, OCLC 1715665, page 154:
      Äs seï ä schwarzä Maa mitemä Huet gsii, aber uuni Chopf. «Ich haa ds Büechli nid beï mer, sus hett nä aagsprocha...», heï dr Pfarrer Zwyfel gsäit. Gsii isch es dr Ggaueler.
      It has [reportedly] been a black man with a hat but without a head. “I didn't have the booklet on me, otherwise I would have talked to him...” has pastor Zwyfel said [reportedly]. It has been the [Ggaueler?].
    • 1970, Alois Senti, Häxäwärch: Sibä Gschichtä im Flumsertiäläggt[5], Verlag des Sarganserländers, LCCN 72340077, OCLC 249211944, page 27:
      Wägemä äinzigä Moul hät aber niemert müügä nämis säägä. Sus hett jo dr Leïrer Aberli schu än Uusreïd gfundä, ass er nid hett müessä guu.
      But nobody wanted to say anything [only] because of a single time. Otherwise the teacher Aberli would have found an excuse anyway so that he wouldn't have had to go.

Related termsEdit


AromanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin sūsum, from Latin sursūm. Compare Romanian sus.

AdverbEdit

sus

  1. up

AntonymsEdit


CebuanoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably a shortening of susmaryosep.

InterjectionEdit

sus

  1. used as an expression of anger, frustration or disbelief

ChuukeseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English shoes.

NounEdit

sus

  1. shoe

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the verb suse (to hiss, whistle), of imitative origin, similar to German sausen (to whizz).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sus n (singular definite suset, plural indefinite sus)

  1. whistling, singing
  2. whisper, soughing
  3. whizz
  4. rush (pleasurable sensation experienced after use of a stimulant)

InflectionEdit

SynonymsEdit

VerbEdit

sus

  1. imperative of suse

FinnishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Shortening from Jeesus.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈsus/, [ˈs̠us̠]
  • Rhymes: -us
  • Syllabification: sus

InterjectionEdit

sus

  1. oh; used only in the expression shown in the example below

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French sus, from Vulgar Latin sūsum, from Latin sūrsum. Cognate to Italian su.

AdverbEdit

sus

  1. (dated) up
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

sus

  1. first/second-person singular past historic of savoir

Further readingEdit


IrarutuEdit

NounEdit

sus

  1. (woman's) breast

ReferencesEdit

  • J. C. Anceaux, The Linguistic Situation in the Islands of Yapen, Kurudu, Nau and Miosnum (2013), page 46

KashubianEdit

 
Sus.

EtymologyEdit

From a back-formation of Proto-Slavic *sъsьlъ. Cognates include Polish suseł and Czech sysel.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈsus/
  • Hyphenation: sus

NounEdit

sus m anim

  1. ground squirrel (rodent of the genus Spermophilus)

ReferencesEdit

  • Eùgeniusz Gòłąbk (2011), “suseł”, in Słownik Polsko-Kaszubski / Słowôrz Pòlskò-Kaszëbsczi

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *sūs, from Proto-Indo-European *suH-. Compare Ancient Greek ὗς (hûs), Pali sūkara, English swine, sow.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sūs m or f (irregular, genitive suis); third declension

  1. pig
    Synonyms: porcus, scrōfa

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun (irregular).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative sūs suēs
Genitive suis suum
Dative suī suibus
sūbus
subus
Accusative suem suēs
Ablative sue suibus
sūbus
subus
Vocative sūs suēs

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Romanian: sor (possibly)
  • Sardinian: sughe, sue

ReferencesEdit

  • sus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • sus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • sus in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • sus in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[6], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) to have become independent, be no longer a minor: sui iuris factum esse
    • (ambiguous) to outlive, survive all one's kin: omnium suorum or omnibus suis superstitem esse
    • (ambiguous) to shed one's blood for one's fatherland: sanguinem suum pro patria effundere or profundere
    • (ambiguous) to take measures for one's safety; to look after one's own interests: suis rebus or sibi consulere
    • (ambiguous) to employ in the furtherance of one's interests: aliquid in usum suum conferre
    • (ambiguous) to leave a great reputation behind one: magnam sui famam relinquere
    • (ambiguous) to use up, make full use of one's spare time: otio abūti or otium ad suum usum transferre
    • (ambiguous) to win renown amongst posterity by some act: nomen suum posteritati aliqua re commendare, propagare, prodere
    • (ambiguous) to immortalise one's name: memoriam nominis sui immortalitati tradere, mandare, commendare
    • (ambiguous) to take a thing to heart: demittere aliquid in pectus or in pectus animumque suum
    • (ambiguous) to be contented: rebus suis, sorte sua contentum esse
    • (ambiguous) to lose one's head, be beside oneself: sui (mentis) compotem non esse
    • (ambiguous) to despair of one's position: desperare suis rebus
    • (ambiguous) to cause oneself to be expected: exspectationem sui facere, commovere
    • (ambiguous) self-confidence: fiducia sui (Liv. 25. 37)
    • (ambiguous) a man of no self-control, self-indulgent: homo impotens sui
    • (ambiguous) to do one's duty: officium suum facere, servare, colere, tueri, exsequi, praestare
    • (ambiguous) to neglect one's duty: officium suum deserere, neglegere
    • (ambiguous) to be courteous, obliging to some one: aliquem officiis suis complecti, prosequi
    • (ambiguous) to follow one's inclinations: studiis suis obsequi (De Or. 1. 1. 3)
    • (ambiguous) to be a strict disciplinarian in one's household: severum imperium in suis exercere, tenere (De Sen. 11. 37)
    • (ambiguous) to go into mourning: vestem mutare (opp. ad vestitum suum redire) (Planc. 12. 29)
    • (ambiguous) to give audience to some one: sui potestatem facere, praebere alicui
    • (ambiguous) to have no debts: in suis nummis versari (Verr. 4. 6. 11)
    • (ambiguous) (a state) has its own laws, is autonomous: suis legibus utitur (B. G. 1. 45. 3)
    • (ambiguous) to grant a people its independence: populum liberum esse, libertate uti, sui iuris esse pati
    • (ambiguous) to assert one's right: ius suum persequi
    • (ambiguous) to obtain justice: ius suum adipisci (Liv. 1. 32. 10)
    • (ambiguous) to maintain one's right: ius suum tenere, obtinere
    • (ambiguous) to accept battle: potestatem sui facere (alicui) (cf. sect. XII. 9, note audientia...)
  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7)‎[7], Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN
  • Meyer-Lübke, Wilhelm (1911), “sūs”, in Romanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch (in German), page 639

MalteseEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

sus

  1. second-person singular imperative of sies

Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French sus.

AdverbEdit

sus

  1. on; on top of

PrepositionEdit

sus

  1. on; on top of; atop

DescendantsEdit

  • French: sus (obsolete)

Middle High GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German sus.

AdverbEdit

sus

  1. in this manner that follows, thus
  2. otherwise

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit


NormanEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French sus, from Latin sursum.

PrepositionEdit

sus

  1. (Guernsey) on

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

sus

  1. first-person singular preterite of saver

Northern SamiEdit

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

PronounEdit

sus

  1. locative of son

Norwegian NynorskEdit

VerbEdit

sus

  1. imperative of susa

Old FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin subtus.

Alternative formsEdit

PrepositionEdit

sus

  1. under; underneath
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Late Latin sūsum, from Latin sūrsum.

PrepositionEdit

sus

  1. on; on top of; atop
DescendantsEdit

See alsoEdit


Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Related to Proto-West Germanic *swā (in this manner), see also Dutch zus.

AdverbEdit

sus

  1. in this manner that follows, thus

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. Sievers, Eduard. (2nd. ed. 1892) Bibliothek der ältesten deutschen Litteratur-Denkmäler. V. Band. Tatian. Lateinisch und altdeutsch mit ausführlichem Glossar herausgegeben, p. 438

PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Mazurzenie of szus, from German Schuss, from Middle High German, from Old High German scuz, from Proto-West Germanic *skuti.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sus m inan

  1. caper, jump, leap (long, quick jump)
    • 1922, Voltaire, chapter 1, in Tadeusz Boy-Żeleński, transl., Prostaczek (L'ingénu):
      Zgoła inaczej zachował się pewien młody człowiek bardzo zręcznej postaci, który skoczył jednym susem poprzez głowy towarzyszy i znalazł się tuż nawprost panienki.
      That was not the behavior of a well-made youth, who, darting himself over the heads of his companions, suddenly stood before Miss Kerkabon.

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • sus in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • sus in Polish dictionaries at PWN

PortugueseEdit

InterjectionEdit

sus!

  1. come on! (inducing courage or willpower)

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin sūsum, from Latin sūrsum.

AdverbEdit

sus

  1. up

AntonymsEdit

See alsoEdit


SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

sus pl (possessive)

  1. plural of su; one's, his, her, its, their (with plural possessee)
  2. (formal) Your (with plural possessee)

Related termsEdit

InterjectionEdit

sus

  1. c'mon; attaboy

Further readingEdit


TurkishEdit

VerbEdit

sus

  1. second-person singular imperative of susmak

ZazakiEdit

NounEdit

sus n

  1. A plant used in drug production