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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin Sybarīta, from Ancient Greek Συβαρίτης (Subarítēs, inhabitant of Subaris), from Σύβαρις (Súbaris), an ancient Greek city in southeastern Italy noted for the luxurious, pleasure-seeking habits of many of its inhabitants.

PronunciationEdit

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NounEdit

sybarite (plural sybarites)

  1. A person devoted to pleasure and luxury.
    Synonym: voluptuary
    Antonym: hedonophobe
    • 1969, Victor Ernest Watts (translator), Anicius Manlius Severinus Boëthius (author), The Consolation of Philosophy, Penguin Books, book III, chapter iv, page 87:
      Although the proud lord clothed himself // In purple robes and gem-stones white, // Yet Nero grew to all men’s hate // A wild and cruel sybarite.
    • 2009 January 22, Stephen Holden, “Passion and Pain at Sea, With Fatal Consequences”, in New York Times[1]:
      Lisa (Sian Breckin), the blondest and wildest of the women; Kim (Jamie Winstone), who is ready and willing; and Tammi (Nichola Burley), the most reluctant sybarite, are from Leeds.
    • 2011 December 16, William Grimes, “Christopher Hitchens, Polemicist Who Slashed All, Freely, Dies at 62”, in New York Times[2]:
      Thus began a dual career as political agitator and upper-crust sybarite. He arranged a packed schedule of antiwar demonstrations by day and Champagne-flooded parties with Oxford’s elite at night.

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FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin Sybarita

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sybarite (plural sybarites)

  1. related to Sybaris
  2. soft, effeminate, living in pleasure and luxury
    Ces docteurs frivoles, ces philosophes sybarites qui repoussent toute pensée sérieuse. (Jouy, Hermite, t. 2, 1812)

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NounEdit

sybarite m (plural sybarites)

  1. sybarite, person devoted to pleasure and luxury
    Je compris ce qui chagrinait le marquis dans son bonheur, et je découvris quel était le pli de rose dont soupirait ce sybarite sur sa couche de volupté. (Théophile Gautier, Fracasse, 1863)

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