thack

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

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Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English thakken(to stroke), from Old English þaccian(to touch gently, stroke, tap), from Proto-Germanic *þakwōną(to touch lightly), from Proto-Indo-European *tag-, *taǵ-(to touch). Cognate with Old Dutch þakolōn(to stroke), Old Norse þykkr(a thwack, thump, blow), Icelandic þjökka, þjaka(to thwack, thump, beat), Norwegian tjåka(to strike, beat), Latin tangō(touch). More at thwack, tangent.

VerbEdit

thack ‎(third-person singular simple present thacks, present participle thacking, simple past and past participle thacked)

  1. (transitive) To strike; thump; thwack.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English thacce, from thakken(to stroke). See above.

NounEdit

thack ‎(plural thacks)

  1. A stroke; a thwack.

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English thak, thakk, thakke, from Old English þæc, from Proto-Germanic *þaką, from Proto-Indo-European *teg-. Cognate with Dutch dak, Low German Dack, Danish tag(roof), German Dach(roof), Old Norse þak(thatch, roof). Akin to Latin toga(garment) and Ancient Greek στέγος(stégos, roof)[1]. See also thatch.

NounEdit

thack ‎(plural thacks)

  1. the weatherproof outer layer of a roof, often thatch specifically
    • 1952, L.F. Salzman, Building in England, p. 223.
      This outer layer was generically known as 'thack', but, owing to the fact that the vast majority of buildings in early times were covered with a thacking of straw or some similar material, 'thatch' gradually acquired its modern restricted significance of straw, or reed, heling.

VerbEdit

thack ‎(third-person singular simple present thacks, present participle thacking, simple past and past participle thacked)

  1. To cover a roof with thack.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ tag” in Ordbog over det danske Sprog