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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English thirl, thiril, from Old English þyrel (a hole made through anything, opening, aperture, orifice, perforation), from Proto-Germanic *þurhilą (hole, opening), from Proto-Indo-European *tr̥h₂kʷelo- which is *tr̥h₂kʷe + *-lo (equivalent to through +‎ -le) from *terh₂-. Related to thrill, drill.

NounEdit

thirl (plural thirls)

  1. (archaic or dialectal) A hole, aperture, especially a nostril.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English thirlen, thurlen, thorlen, from Old English þyrlian, þyrelian (to make a hole through, pierce through, perforate; make hollow, excavate; make vain), from the noun (see above).

VerbEdit

thirl (third-person singular simple present thirls, present participle thirling, simple past and past participle thirled)

  1. To pierce, perforate, penetrate.
    • 1567 Arthur Golding: Ovid's Metamorphoses Bk. 3 lines 78-81
      But yet his hardnesse savde him not against the piercing dart.
      For hitting right betweene the scales that yeelded in that part
      Whereas the joynts doe knit the backe, it thirled through the skin,
      And pierced to his filthy mawe and greedy guts within.
  2. (obsolete) To drill or bore.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Origin uncertain. Perhaps a blend of throw +‎ hurl.

VerbEdit

thirl (third-person singular simple present thirls, present participle thirling, simple past and past participle thirled)

  1. (obsolete) To throw (a projectile).