transvestite

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Latin trans + vestite, form of vestiō (I clothe, I dress) (as in English vestment, vest). Literally, a "cross-dresser". From transvestitism, from German Transvestitismus, coined in 1910 by Magnus Hirschfeld (the practice itself is much older).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tɹænzˈvɛstaɪt/

NounEdit

transvestite (plural transvestites)

  1. A person who sometimes wears clothes traditionally worn by and associated with the opposite sex; typically a male who cross-dresses occasionally by habit or personal choice.
  2. (clinical psychology, psychiatry, pathology) A person, typically a heterosexual male, who compulsively seeks and derives paraphilic sexual arousal from cross-dressing, especially if the urges and behavior cause the patient distress or social impairment.

Usage notesEdit

  • This term is relatively formal (Latinate); cross-dresser is more casual, but whereas the verb cross-dress is common, the verb transvest is quite rare.
  • Transvestite should not be confused with transgender (see that term for more); transvestites are often happy with their gender and have no desire to change their sex, but simply enjoy being able to cross-dress from time to time. When speaking of to or about an individual who identifies as transgender, the term transvestite is typically seen as derogatory.
  • The term should also not be confused with drag queen (person who performs femininity) or drag king (person who performs masculinity); those terms are specifically for performers.
  • The clinical definition is far more restrictive than the colloquial usage of the term, drawing a sharp distinction between a transvestite versus those who engage in other types of cross-dressing not associated with sexual arousal—such as a drag queen who cross-dresses to perform a role for entertainment purposes.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Oliven, John F., M.D. (1974) Clinical Sexuality: A Manual for the Physician and the Professions, Third edition, Philadelphia, PA: J.B. Lippincott Company, →ISBN
  • American Psychiatric Association (1980) Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM-III), Third edition, Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc., →ISBN
  • American Psychiatric Association (1987) Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM-III-R), Third Revised edition, Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc., →ISBN
  • World Health Organization (1992) The ICD-10 Classification of Mental and Behavioural Disorders: Clinical Descriptions and Diagnostic Guidelines, Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization, →ISBN
  • American Psychiatric Association (1994) Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM-IV), Fourth edition, Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc., →ISBN
  • American Psychiatric Association (2000) Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM-IV-TR), Fourth Text Revision edition, Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc., →ISBN
  • American Psychiatric Association (2013) Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM-5), Fifth edition, Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc., →ISBN