trapezium

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Recorded since 1570, learned borrowing from Late Latin trapezium, from Ancient Greek τραπέζιον (trapézion, irregular quadrilateral, literally a little table), diminutive of τράπεζα (trápeza, table). Doublet of trapeze.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tɹəˈpiː.zi.əm/
  • (file)

NounEdit

trapezium (plural trapeziums or trapezia)

  1. (geometry, Britain, Australia, New Zealand) A four-sided polygon with two sides parallel
  2. (geometry, US, dated) A four-sided polygon with no parallel sides and no sides equal; a simple convex irregular quadrilateral.
  3. (anatomy) The trapezium bone of the wrist.
  4. A region on the ventral side of the brain, either just back of the pons Varolii, or, as in man, covered by the posterior extension of its transverse fibers.

Usage notesEdit

  • (geometry): The terms trapezium and trapezoid have swapped meanings in the US and Canada as compared with the rest of the world.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


DutchEdit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin trapezium, from Ancient Greek τραπέζιον (trapézion, irregular quadrilateral), diminutive of τράπεζα (trápeza, table).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

trapezium n (plural trapeziums or trapezia, diminutive trapeziumpje n)

  1. (geometry) A trapezium, trapezoid, a quadrilateral with two sides parallel

Related termsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Late Latin; from Ancient Greek τραπέζιον (trapézion, irregular quadrilateral, literally a little table), diminutive of τράπεζα (trápeza, table).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

trapezium n (genitive trapeziī or trapezī); second declension

  1. trapezium, trapezoid (four-sided shape with no sides parallel and no equal sides)

DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun (neuter).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative trapezium trapezia
Genitive trapeziī
trapezī1
trapeziōrum
Dative trapeziō trapeziīs
Accusative trapezium trapezia
Ablative trapeziō trapeziīs
Vocative trapezium trapezia

1Found in older Latin (until the Augustan Age).

DescendantsEdit