triangle

See also: Triangle

EnglishEdit

 
A regular triangle, the geometric shape.
 
A triangle, the musical instrument.
 
The triangles, a whipping post formed by three poles.

EtymologyEdit

PIE word
*tréyes

From Middle English triangle, from Old French triangle, from Latin triangulum, noun use of adjective triangulus (three-cornered, having three angles), from trēs (three) + angulus (corner, angle).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈtɹaɪəŋɡəl/, /ˈtɹaɪˌæŋɡəl/
  • (US) enPR: trī'-ăng-gəl, IPA(key): /ˈtɹaɪˌæŋɡəl/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪæŋɡəl
  • Hyphenation: tri‧an‧gle

NounEdit

triangle (plural triangles)

  1. (geometry) A polygon with three sides and three angles.
  2. (US, Canada) A set square.
  3. (music) A percussion instrument made by forming a metal rod into a triangular shape which is open at one angle. It is suspended from a string and hit with a metal bar to make a resonant sound.
  4. (cue sports) A triangular piece of equipment used for gathering the balls into the formation required by the game being played.
  5. A love triangle.
    • 2009, Neil McDonald, Quadrant, November 2009, No. 461 (Volume LIII, Number 11), Quadrant Magazine Limited, page 104:
      One of the writers' most pleasing inventions was to treat the triangle love story as comedy.
  6. (systemics) The structure of systems composed with three interrelated objects.
  7. A draughtsman's square in the form of a right-angled triangle.
  8. (historical, usually in the plural) A frame formed of three poles stuck in the ground and united at the top, to which people were bound when undergoing corporal punishment.
    • 1868, “The Week”, in The Nation[1], volume 6, number 149:
      But nothing is said as to what we are to do with the negro when we have cut him off from absolute dominion; we are not informed if we may spread him on the triangles as aforetime;
  9. Any of various large papilionid butterflies of the genus Graphium.
    Synonym: bluebottle
  10. (rail transport) A triangular formation of railway tracks, with a curve on at least one side.
    • 1961 March, "Balmore", “Driving and firing modern French steam locomotives”, in Trains Illustrated, page 147:
      After turning on the triangle at Jeumont, we set off light engine back to Aulnoye.
    Synonym: wye

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

 
Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ca

EtymologyEdit

From Latin triangulum.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

triangle m (plural triangles)

  1. (geometry) triangle
  2. (music) triangle

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin triangulum. Synchronically analysable as tri- +‎ angle.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

triangle m (plural triangles)

  1. (geometry) triangle (polygon)
    triangle équilatéralequilateral triangle
    triangle isocèleisosceles triangle
  2. (music) triangle (percussion instrument)

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit