See also: Wye

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

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Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Attested as wi c. 1200. Of uncertain origin. Perhaps cognate with Old French ui or gui. However Old Irish had a glyph, a u with an i underneath it, and pronounced wye.

NounEdit

wye (plural wyes)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter Y.
  2. A Y-shaped object: a wye level, wye-connected. Especially a Y-shaped connection of three sections of road or railroad track.
    By going around the wye, a train can change direction.
    Synonym: triangle
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

wye (third-person singular simple present wyes, present participle wyeing or wying, simple past and past participle wyed)

  1. (transitive, rail transport) To reverse the direction of a train using a wye.
    Since the train didn't have a control cab at the other end, they wyed the train to turn it around for the trip back to the city.

Etymology 2Edit

Old English wiga.

NounEdit

wye (plural wyes)

  1. (poetic, obsolete) A warrior or fighter.
  2. (poetic, obsolete) A hero; a man, person.

AnagramsEdit


DakakaEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

wye

  1. (West Ambryn) water

ReferencesEdit