See also: Trine, triné, and trinë

English

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Middle English trine, from Middle French trin, from Latin trīnus.

Adjective

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trine (not comparable)

  1. Triple; threefold.
  2. (astrology) Denoting the aspect of two celestial bodies which are 120° apart.
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: [...] John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, →OCLC, partition III, section 1, member 2, subsection ii:
      The physicians refer this to their temperament, astrologers to trine and sextile aspects, or opposite of their several ascendants, lords of their genitures, love and hatred of planets [...]
Synonyms
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Noun

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trine (plural trines)

  1. A group of three things.
  2. (astrology) An aspect of two astrological bodies when 120° apart.
Synonyms
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Verb

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trine (third-person singular simple present trines, present participle trining, simple past and past participle trined)

  1. (transitive, astrology) To put in the aspect of a trine.
    • 1697, Virgil, “Palamon and Arcite”, in John Dryden, transl., The Works of Virgil: Containing His Pastorals, Georgics, and Æneis. [], London: [...] Jacob Tonson, [], →OCLC:
      By fortune he [Saturn] was now to Venus trined.
  2. (archaic, UK, thieves' cant) To hang; to execute (someone) by suspension from the neck.
    • 1612, Thomas Dekker, Lantern and Candlelight[1]:
      Been Darkmans then booz Mort and Ken, / The been Coves bing awast / On Chats to trine by Rum-Coves dine, / For his long lib at last.
    • 1988, Timberlake Wertenbaker, Our Country's Good, act 2, scene 1:
      Liz, he says, why trine for a make, when you can wap for a winne. I'm no dimber mort, I says. Don't ask you to be a swell mollisher, sister, coves want Miss Laycock, don't look at your mug. So I begin to sell my mother of saints.

Etymology 2

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From Middle English trynen, of North Germanic origin, from Old Norse troða (to walk, tread); compare Old Swedish trina (to go).

Verb

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trine (third-person singular simple present trines, present participle trining, simple past and past participle trined)

  1. (obsolete, UK, thieves' cant) To go.
    • 1647, John Fletcher, Beggars' Bush[2], published 1706, act 3, scene 3, page 42:
      Twang dell's, i' the strommell, and let the Quire Cuffin: / And Herman Beck strine and trine to the Ruffin.
    • 1673, Richard Head, “The Beggars Curse”, in The Canting Academy[3]:
      From thence at the Nubbing-cheat we trine in the Lightmans.

References

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Anagrams

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Caló

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Numeral

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trine

  1. Alternative form of trin (three)

References

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  • trine” in Francisco Quindalé, Diccionario gitano, Madrid: Oficina Tipográfica del Hospicio.

Italian

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Noun

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trine f

  1. plural of trina

Anagrams

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Latin

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Pronunciation

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Numeral

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trīne

  1. vocative masculine singular of trīnus

References

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Middle English

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Etymology 1

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Borrowed from Middle French trin, from Latin trīnus.

Alternative forms

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Pronunciation

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Adjective

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trine

  1. trine, triple
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Descendants
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  • English: trine
References
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Etymology 2

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Verb

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trine

  1. Alternative form of trynen

Portuguese

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Verb

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trine

  1. inflection of trinar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

Spanish

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Verb

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trine

  1. inflection of trinar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative