See also: Trine, triné, and trinë

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English trine, from Middle French trin, from Latin trīnus.

AdjectiveEdit

trine (not comparable)

  1. Triple; threefold.
  2. (astrology) Denoting the aspect of two celestial bodies which are 120° apart.
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 54573970, partition III, section 1, member 2, subsection ii:
      The physicians refer this to their temperament, astrologers to trine and sextile aspects, or opposite of their several ascendants, lords of their genitures, love and hatred of planets []
SynonymsEdit

NounEdit

trine (plural trines)

  1. A group of three things.
  2. (astrology) An aspect of two astrological bodies when 120° apart.
SynonymsEdit

VerbEdit

trine (third-person singular simple present trines, present participle trining, simple past and past participle trined)

  1. (transitive, astrology) To put in the aspect of a trine.
    • 1697, “Palamon and Arcite”, in John Dryden, transl., The Works of Virgil: Containing His Pastorals, Georgics, and Æneis. [], London: [] Jacob Tonson, [], OCLC 403869432:
      By fortune he [Saturn] was now to Venus trined.
  2. (obsolete, Britain, thieves' cant) To hang; To execute (someone) by suspension from the neck.
    • 1612, Dekker, Thomas, Lantern and Candlelight[1]:
      Been Darkmans then booz Mort and Ken, / The been Coves bing awast / On Chats to trine by Rum-Coves dine, / For his long lib at last.
    • 1988, Wertenbaker, Timberlake, Our Country's Good, Act 2, Scene 1:
      Liz, he says, why trine for a make, when you can wap for a winne. I'm no dimber mort, I says. Don't ask you to be a swell mollisher, sister, coves want Miss Laycock, don't look at your mug. So I begin to sell my mother of saints.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English trynen, from North Germanic; compare Old Swedish trina (to go).

VerbEdit

trine (third-person singular simple present trines, present participle trining, simple past and past participle trined)

  1. (obsolete, Britain, thieves' cant) To go.
    • 1647, Fletcher, John, Beggars' Bush[2], published 1706, Act 3, Scene 3, page 42:
      Twang dell's, i' the strommell, and let the Quire Cuffin: / And Herman Beck strine and trine to the Ruffin.
    • 1673, Head, Richard, “The Beggars Curse”, in The Canting Academy[3]:
      From thence at the Nubbing-cheat we trine in the Lightmans.

AnagramsEdit


CalóEdit

NumeralEdit

trine

  1. Alternative form of trin (three)

ReferencesEdit

  • trine” in Francisco Quindalé, Diccionario gitano, Madrid: Oficina Tipográfica del Hospicio.

ItalianEdit

NounEdit

trine f

  1. plural of trina

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

trīne

  1. vocative masculine singular of trīnus

ReferencesEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Middle French trin, from Latin trīnus.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

trine

  1. trine, triple
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • English: trine
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

trine

  1. Alternative form of trynen

PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

trine

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of trinar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of trinar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of trinar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of trinar

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

trine

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of trinar.
  2. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of trinar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of trinar.