tristis

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *treistis, from Proto-Indo-European *tréystis (note that this root is only found in Latin and Germanic languages).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

trīstis (neuter trīste, comparative trīstior, superlative trīstissimus, adverb trīste); third-declension two-termination adjective

  1. sad, unhappy, melancholy, morose
  2. sorrowful, mournful
  3. (of taste) disagreeable, harsh, bitter
  4. (of smell) foul, offensive

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension two-termination adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masc./Fem. Neuter Masc./Fem. Neuter
Nominative trīstis trīste trīstēs trīstia
Genitive trīstis trīstium
Dative trīstī trīstibus
Accusative trīstem trīste trīstēs
trīstīs
trīstia
Ablative trīstī trīstibus
Vocative trīstis trīste trīstēs trīstia

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • tristis in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • tristis in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • tristis in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • tristis in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) an evil omen; presage of ill: omen infaustum, triste