Translingual edit

Symbol edit

sad

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2 & ISO 639-3 language code for Sandawe.

English edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English sad, from Old English sæd (sated, full), from Proto-Germanic *sadaz (sated, satisfied), from Proto-Indo-European *seh₂- (to satiate, satisfy). Cognate to West Frisian sêd, Dutch zat, German satt.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /sæd/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æd

Adjective edit

sad (comparative sadder or more sad, superlative saddest or most sad)

  1. (heading) Emotionally negative.
    1. Feeling sorrow; sorrowful, mournful.
      She gets sad when he's away.
    2. Appearing sorrowful.
      The puppy had a sad little face.
      • 2010 February, Eric Rentschler, Itoh's Ghost[1], iUniverse, →ISBN, →OCLC, page 54:
        We need a sad man. Give us a sad man.” Tomo gave the look of a sad man, then followed with the body of a sad man. “That's it, more of that. can you manufacture a mole right here? Yes, a very ugly mole. Right here, on the chin. []
    3. Causing sorrow; lamentable.
      It's a sad fact that most rapes go unreported.
      • 1911, G. K. Chesterton, The Ballad of the White Horse:
        The Great Gaels of Ireland are the men that God made mad, / For all their wars are merry and all their songs are sad.
      • 1963, Margery Allingham, “Eye Witness”, in The China Governess: A Mystery, London: Chatto & Windus, →OCLC, page 249:
        The story struck the depressingly familiar note with which true stories ring in the tried ears of experienced policemen. No one queried it. It was in the classic pattern of human weakness, mean and embarrassing and sad.
    4. Poor in quality, bad; shameful, deplorable; later, regrettable, poor.
      That's the saddest-looking pickup truck I've ever seen.
    5. Of colours: dark, deep; later, sombre, dull.
      • 1650, Thomas Browne, “Compendiously of Sundry Other Common Tenents, Concerning Minerall and Terreous Bodies, Which Examined, Prove Either False or Dubious”, in Pseudodoxia Epidemica: [], 2nd edition, London: [] A[braham] Miller, for Edw[ard] Dod and Nath[aniel] Ekins, [], →OCLC, 2nd book, page 69:
        [] this is either uſed crude, and called ſulphur vive, and is of a ſadder colour; or after depuration, ſuch as we have in magdeleons or rols of a lighter yellow.
      • 1679, Izaak Walton, The Life of Bishop Robert Sanderson:
        sad-coloured clothes
      • 1707, J[ohn] Mortimer, The Whole Art of Husbandry; or, The Way of Managing and Improving of Land. [], 2nd edition, London: [] J[ohn] H[umphreys] for H[enry] Mortlock [], and J[onathan] Robinson [], published 1708, →OCLC:
        Woad, or wade, is used by the dyers to lay the foundation of many colours, especially all sad colours.
  2. (obsolete) Sated, having had one's fill; satisfied, weary.
  3. (obsolete) Steadfast, valiant.
  4. (obsolete) Dignified, serious, grave.
  5. (obsolete) Naughty; troublesome; wicked.
    • 1859, Ferna Vale, Natalie; or, A Gem Among the Sea-Weeds:
      Mr. Santon laughed, and merely said,—"Oh, you cruel beauty!" returning to his paper again; but, seated in the bay-window was one, who could not thus lightly look upon the conduct of the coquettish Winnie, for it was evident she was a sad coquette.
    • 1860, Isaac Taylor, “Essay III. Modern Advancements and Lay Inventors.”, in Ultimate Civilization and Other Essays, London: Bell and Daldy [], →OCLC, section IX, page 227:
      In ſuch places, it would not be doubted, that a grim Daniel Scroggins, and an aproned Sam Smith, might be found—ſad tipſy fellows, both of them, to whoſe ingenuity this or that mechanical improvement had been due.
  6. (slang) Unfashionable; socially inadequate or undesirable.
    I can't believe you use drugs; you're so sad!
  7. (dialect) Soggy (to refer to pastries).
  8. (obsolete) Heavy; weighty; ponderous; close; hard.
    sad bread
Synonyms edit
Antonyms edit
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit
Translations edit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.
Further reading edit

Verb edit

sad (third-person singular simple present sads, present participle sadding, simple past and past participle sadded)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To make melancholy; to sadden or grieve (someone).
    • 16??, John Webster, Appius and Virginia
      My father's wondrous pensive, and withal / With a suppress'd rage left his house displeas'd, / And so in post is hurried to the camp: / It sads me much; to expel which melancholy, / I have sent for company.

Etymology 2 edit

Noun edit

sad (plural sads)

  1. Alternative form of saad (Arabic letter)

Anagrams edit

Cebuano edit

Pronunciation edit

  • Hyphenation: sad

Adverb edit

sad

  1. (focus) also; too
  2. (after a negative) either

Czech edit

 
Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Old Czech sad, from Proto-Slavic *sadъ.

Noun edit

sad m inan

  1. orchard
Declension edit
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun edit

sad

  1. genitive plural of sada

Further reading edit

  • sad in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • sad in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989
  • sad in Internetová jazyková příručka

Danish edit

Verb edit

sad

  1. past of sidde

Gothic edit

Romanization edit

sad

  1. Romanization of 𐍃𐌰𐌳

Livonian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Finnic *sato.

Noun edit

sad

  1. precipitation (hail, rain, snow)

Lower Sorbian edit

 
sad

Etymology edit

From Proto-Slavic *sadъ (plant, garden). Cognate with Upper Sorbian sad, Polish sad (orchard), Czech sad (orchard), Russian сад (sad, orchard, garden), Old Church Slavonic садъ (sadŭ, plant, garden).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

sad m inan

  1. fruit (food)

Declension edit

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old English sæd, from Proto-West Germanic *sad, from Proto-Germanic *sadaz, from Proto-Indo-European *seh₂-.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

sad (plural and weak singular sadde, comparative saddere, superlative saddest)

  1. sated, weary (having had enough) [from 9th c.]
  2. firm, solid, hard: [from 14th c.]
    1. steady, enduring
    2. intense, powerful, severe
    3. secure (inspiring trust)
    4. dense, thick, tightly-packed
  3. considered, thoughtful, serious [from 14th c.]
  4. sad (inspiring or having sorrow) [from 14th c.]
  5. authentic, true, genuine [from 15th c.]
  6. (of colors) dark, deep [from 15th c.]
Related terms edit
Descendants edit
  • English: sad
  • Scots: sad

Adverb edit

sad (comparative saddere)

  1. firmly, solidly, steadily
  2. strongly, intensely
  3. seriously, consideredly
  4. sadly (in a sorrowful way)
Descendants edit
  • English: sad (dialectal)
  • Scots: sad

References edit

Etymology 2 edit

Noun edit

sad

  1. (Early Middle English) Alternative form of seed (seed)

Etymology 3 edit

Verb edit

sad

  1. Alternative form of saden

Old Saxon edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-West Germanic *sad, from Proto-Germanic *sadaz, from Proto-Indo-European *seh₂- (to satiate, satisfy).

Adjective edit

sad (comparative sadoro, superlative sadost)

  1. full, sated, satiated
  2. weary

Declension edit


Descendants edit

  • Middle Low German sat

Polish edit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl
 
sad

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *sadъ.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

sad m inan (diminutive sadek, related adjective sadowy)

  1. (agriculture, horticulture) orchard (land for cultivation of fruit or nut trees)

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

noun

Related terms edit

adjective
noun

Related terms edit

verb

Further reading edit

  • sad in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • sad in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Old Church Slavonic садъ (sadŭ).

Noun edit

sad n (plural saduri)

  1. (dated) orchard

Declension edit

Scots edit

Etymology edit

From Old English sæd.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

sad (comparative sadder, superlative saddest)

  1. grave, serious
  2. strange, remarkable
  3. sad

Serbo-Croatian edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *sьda, *sьgoda.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

sȁd (Cyrillic spelling са̏д)

  1. now
  2. currently
  3. presently

Etymology 2 edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *sadъ. Compare Russian сад (sad).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

sȃd m (Cyrillic spelling са̑д)

  1. plant nursery, plantation, orchard (specialized facility rather than a home garden)
  2. a seeding or sapling from a plant nursery
Declension edit

References edit

  • sad” in Hrvatski jezični portal
  • sad” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Slovak edit

 
Slovak Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sk

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *sadъ.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

sad m inan (genitive singular sadu, nominative plural sady, genitive plural sadov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. garden, orchard, plantation

Declension edit


Derived terms edit

adjectives
nouns

Further reading edit

  • sad”, in Slovníkový portál Jazykovedného ústavu Ľ. Štúra SAV [Dictionary portal of the Ľ. Štúr Institute of Linguistics, Slovak Academy of Science] (in Slovak), https://slovnik.juls.savba.sk, 2024

Slovene edit

Alternative forms edit

  • ſad (Bohorič alphabet)

Etymology edit

From Proto-Slavic *sȃdъ (plant, garden), from Proto-Balto-Slavic *sādas.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

sȃd m inan

  1. (archaic or literary) fruit
    Synonyms: sadež, plod
  2. (literary) result, outcome
    Synonyms: rezultat, izraz, odraz, pridobitev, otrok, output, posledica, produkt, plod
  3. (obsolete) child, young direct offspring
    Synonyms: otrok, dete, froc, malček, otroček, otročič, otročiček, otrokec, pamž, pestovanček, pestovanec, spestovanec
    Antonyms: starš, roditelj, rodnik, starši
    Zdrava, Marija, milosti polna, Gospod je s Teboj, blagoslovljena si med ženami in blagoslovljen je sad Tvojega telesa Jezus.Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
  4. (literary, rare) consequence
    Synonyms: posledica, nasledek, nastopek, posledek, plod

Usage notes edit

Unlike plod, sad is used more when the edibility is stressed, rather than the seeds it contains.

Declension edit

First masculine declension (hard o-stem, inanimate, -ov- infix), long mixed accent, ending -u in genitive singular
nom. sing. sȃd
gen. sing. sadȗ
singular dual plural
nominative
imenovȃlnik
sȃd sadȏva sadȏvi
genitive
rodȋlnik
sadȗ sadóv sadóv
dative
dajȃlnik
sȃdu, sȃdi sadȏvoma, sadȏvama sadȏvom, sȃdȏvam
accusative
tožȋlnik
sȃd sadȏva sadȏve
locative
mẹ̑stnik
sȃdu, sȃdi sadȏvih sadȏvih
instrumental
orọ̑dnik
sȃdom sadȏvoma, sadȏvama sadȏvi
(vocative)
(ogȏvorni imenovȃlnik)
sȃd sadȏva sadȏvi


First masculine declension (hard o-stem, inanimate, -ov- infix), fixed accent
nom. sing. sȃd
gen. sing. sȃda
singular dual plural
nominative
imenovȃlnik
sȃd sadȏva sadȏvi
genitive
rodȋlnik
sȃda sadóv sadóv
dative
dajȃlnik
sȃdu, sȃdi sadȏvoma, sadȏvama sadȏvom, sȃdȏvam
accusative
tožȋlnik
sȃd sadȏva sadȏve
locative
mẹ̑stnik
sȃdu, sȃdi sadȏvih sadȏvih
instrumental
orọ̑dnik
sȃdom sadȏvoma, sadȏvama sadȏvi
(vocative)
(ogȏvorni imenovȃlnik)
sȃd sadȏva sadȏvi


Derived terms edit

See also edit

Further reading edit

  • sad”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran
  • sad”, in Termania, Amebis
  • See also the general references

Turkish edit

Etymology edit

From Arabicصَاد(ṣād).

Noun edit

sad

  1. Letter of the Arabic alphabet: ⁧ص

Alternative forms edit

Wakhi edit

Etymology edit

Compare Tajik сад (sad).

Numeral edit

sad

  1. hundred