See also: Triste, triște, and třísté

English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English trist, triste (-e form is less common), borrowed from Old French trist, triste,[1] from Latin trīstis (sad, sorrowful). Re-borrowed late 18c. (as “dull, uninteresting”) as a French word in English and often spelled triste.[2]

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

triste (comparative more triste, superlative most triste)

  1. (rare) Sad; sorrowful; gloomy.
    • 1877, R. Elton Smilie, chapter XXIX, in The Manatitlans; or A Record of Scientific Explorations in the Andean La Plata, S. A., Buenos Ayres: Calla Derécho, Imprenta De Razon, pages 399–400:
      He said, he wanted them to take us to Heraclea that we might be educated so that we would be always good, and could be present with him and mamma although absent in body, which would keep them from feeling sad and lonely. But we could see that mamma and he were very, very triste. This made us sorry. So he talked to us of all you had written of the happiness of the people here, because they were truly good and pure in their love toward each other, without selfish concealments; then we were glad and wanted to be with you.

Derived terms edit

References edit

  1. ^ trist(e, adj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007: “OF trist & triste.”
  2. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2024) “trist”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Danish edit

Adjective edit

triste

  1. plural and definite singular attributive of trist

French edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old French triste, borrowed from Latin trīstis. Old French originally had trist, inherited from Vulgar Latin trīstus, a variant of the same word.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

triste (plural tristes)

  1. sad
    Synonyms: chagriné, déçu, désappointé, désenchanté, malheureux
    Antonyms: béat, bienheureux, comblé, content, enchanté, épanoui, gai, heureux, joyeux, ravi, réjoui, satisfait

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Louisiana Creole: tris
  • Danish: trist
  • Dutch: triest
  • English: triste
  • Norwegian Bokmål: trist
  • Norwegian Nynorsk: trist
  • Swedish: trist
  • German: trist

See also edit

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Galician edit

Etymology edit

From Old Galician-Portuguese triste, presumably a borrowing from Latin trīstis.

Adjective edit

triste m or f (plural tristes)

  1. sad, unhappy
    Antonym: alegre

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

German edit

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

triste

  1. inflection of trist:
    1. strong/mixed nominative/accusative feminine singular
    2. strong nominative/accusative plural
    3. weak nominative all-gender singular
    4. weak accusative feminine/neuter singular

Interlingua edit

Adjective edit

triste (comparative plus triste, superlative le plus triste)

  1. sad

Italian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin trīstis. Compare tristo, inherited from Vulgar Latin trīstus, from the same source.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

triste (plural tristi, superlative tristissimo)

  1. sad, unhappy, bleak
    Antonym: allegro

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

References edit

  • triste in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Latin edit

Etymology 1 edit

Adverb edit

trīste (not comparable)

  1. sadly

Etymology 2 edit

Adjective edit

trīste

  1. nominative/accusative/vocative neuter singular of trīstis

References edit

  • triste”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • triste”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • triste in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) an evil omen; presage of ill: omen infaustum, triste

Norman edit

Etymology edit

From Old French triste, borrowed from Latin trīstis.

Adjective edit

triste m or f

  1. (Jersey) sad

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Adjective edit

triste

  1. definite singular of trist
  2. plural of trist

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Adjective edit

triste

  1. definite singular of trist
  2. plural of trist

Old French edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin trīstis.

Adjective edit

triste m (oblique and nominative feminine singular triste)

  1. sad

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

Portuguese edit

Etymology edit

From Old Galician-Portuguese triste, presumably a borrowing from Latin trīstis.

Pronunciation edit

 

  • (Northeast Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈtɾiʃ.ti/
  • Hyphenation: tris‧te

Adjective edit

triste m or f (plural tristes, comparable, comparative mais triste, superlative o mais triste or tristíssimo, diminutive tristinho, augmentative tristão)

  1. (of a person) sad; unhappy; down
    Synonym: infeliz
    Eles estavam tristes porque o inverno começou.They were sad because winter had begun.
  2. (of something) sad (causing sadness)
    Era um filme bastante triste.It was quite a sad film.
  3. (of a person) disappointed
    Synonyms: decepcionado, desapontado
    Estou muito triste com você.I’m really disappointed with you.
  4. (of a situation) lamentable; pitiful
    Synonyms: vergonhoso, lamentável
    A situação das escolas é triste.The situation of the schools is lamentable.

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Romanian edit

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

triste f pl or n pl

  1. nominative/accusative feminine/neuter plural of trist

Spanish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin trīstis. Compare the Old Spanish tristo, inherited from Vulgar Latin trīstus.[1]

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈtɾiste/ [ˈt̪ɾis.t̪e]
  • Audio (Colombia):(file)
  • Rhymes: -iste
  • Syllabification: tris‧te

Adjective edit

triste m or f (masculine and feminine plural tristes, superlative tristísimo)

  1. sad, saddened, blue, gloomy, unhappy, joyless, triste
  2. dismal, dreary, glum, miserable, melancholy
  3. sorrowful, mournful
  4. forlorn
  5. upsetting, saddening
  6. dull

Antonyms edit

Derived terms edit

References edit

Further reading edit

Swedish edit

Adjective edit

triste

  1. definite natural masculine singular of trist

Anagrams edit