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See also: Troupe

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
a troupe of entertainers

EtymologyEdit

Attested 1825. Borrowing from French troupe. Ultimately from the same Germanic root as troop.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

troupe (plural troupes)

  1. A company of, often touring, actors, singers or dancers.
    • 2017 June 26, Alexis Petridis, “Glastonbury 2017 verdict: Radiohead, Foo Fighters, Lorde, Stormzy and more”, in the Guardian[1]:
      Meanwhile, the bills on the main stages skewed towards mainstream pop, with mixed results. Lorde’s Friday evening Other stage appearance was one of the weekend’s highlights. The staging and choreography were fantastic – a giant glass tank on a hydraulic platform, in and around which a troupe of dancers acted out the highs and lows of a teenage party
  2. Any group of people working together on a shared activity.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

troupe (third-person singular simple present troupes, present participle trouping, simple past and past participle trouped)

  1. (intransitive) To tour with a troupe.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Frankish *thorp, from Proto-Germanic *þurpą.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

troupe f (plural troupes)

  1. troop

SynonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French troupe.

NounEdit

troupe f (invariable)

  1. troupe, company (theatrical)

AnagramsEdit


SpanishEdit

NounEdit

troupe f (plural troupes)

  1. troupe