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See also: -ucho and ùchò

Contents

CalóEdit

EtymologyEdit

Perhaps eventually from Sanskrit अवश्या (avaśyā, dew)

NounEdit

ucho m

  1. dew

CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *uxo, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ous-.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈuxo/
  • (file)

NounEdit

ucho n

  1. ear
  2. handle (of a pot)
  3. eye (hole at the blunt end of a needle)

Usage notesEdit

The dual form is used when talking about human or animal ears, no matter of their number (e. g. čtyři králičí uši = four rabbit ears), while the plural is used when referring to various ear-shaped objects (ucha hrnce = handles of a pot).

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *uxo, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ous-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ucho n (diminutive uszko, augmentative uszysko)

  1. ear (body part)
  2. (colloquial) snitch, informant

DeclensionEdit

NounEdit

ucho n (diminutive uszko, augmentative uszysko)

  1. handle (of a basket, kettle etc.)
  2. eye (hole in needle)
  3. earflap

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • ucho in Polish dictionaries at PWN

RomaniEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Sanskrit उच्च (uchcha, high, elevated).

AdjectiveEdit

ucho (feminine uchi, plural uche)

  1. high

SlovakEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *uxo, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ous-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ucho n (genitive singular ucha, nominative plural uši, uchá, genitive plural uší, úch, declension pattern of mesto)

  1. ear
  2. handle (of a basket, kettle etc.)
  3. eye (the part of a needle)

DeclensionEdit

#1 #2, #3

Further readingEdit

  • ucho in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk