See also: DEW and dew-

EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

 
Dew on a spider web

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English dew, from Old English dēaw (dew), from Proto-Germanic *dawwaz, *dawwą (dew, moisture), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewh₂- (smoke, haze). Cognate with German Tau, Dutch dauw and Afrikaans dou. Doublet of dag.

NounEdit

dew (countable and uncountable, plural dews)

  1. (uncountable) Any moisture from the atmosphere condensed by cool bodies upon their surfaces.
  2. (uncountable) Moisture in the air that settles on plants, etc in the morning, resulting in drops.
    Synonym: (obsolete) rore
    • 2013, Warren Ellis; Nick Cave (lyrics), “We No Who U R”, in Push the Sky Away, performed by Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds:
      Tree don't care what the little bird sings / We go down with the dew in the morning light / The tree don't know what the little bird brings / We go down with the dew in the morning
  3. (countable, but see usage notes) An instance of such moisture settling on plants, etc.
    There was a heavy dew this morning.
    • 1834, Letitia Elizabeth Landon, Francesca Carrara, volume 3, page 72:
      On their entrance, Aylmer was greeted by a new surprise—his daughter Lucy, whom he very naturally supposed was quietly in her bed, lay on the window-seat, the casement open, and herself asleep; but the traces of tears were upon her cheek, and her long fair hair loose, and yet saturated with the dews of the night.
  4. (figuratively) Anything that falls lightly and in a refreshing manner.
  5. (figuratively) An emblem of morning, or fresh vigour.

Usage notesEdit

  • Although the countable sense is still used, the plural form is now archaic or poetic only.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English dewe, dewyn, from Old English *dēawian, from Proto-West Germanic *dauwēn, from Proto-Germanic *dawwāną. Cognates include Saterland Frisian daue, German tauen and Dutch dauwen.

VerbEdit

dew (third-person singular simple present dews, present participle dewing, simple past and past participle dewed)

  1. To wet with, or as if with, dew; to moisten.
    • 1887, Andrew B. Saxton, "Sunken Graves", in The Century
      The grasses grew / A little ranker since they dewed them so.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From adéu.

InterjectionEdit

dew

  1. (Internet slang) bye

CornishEdit

Cornish cardinal numbers
 <  1 2 3  > 
    Cardinal : dew
    Ordinal : nessa
    Feminine : diw

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Brythonic *dọw, from Proto-Celtic *dwau, from Proto-Indo-European *dwóh₁.

NumeralEdit

dew m (feminine form diw)

  1. two

MutationEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English dēaw, from Proto-Germanic *dawwaz, *dawwą.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dew (plural dewes)

  1. dew; moisture present on plants.
  2. (figuratively) A rejuvenating substance.
  3. (rare) Sodden or water-soaked terrain.
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • English: dew
  • Scots: dew, deow, dyow
  • Yola: dhew
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

AdjectiveEdit

dew

  1. Alternative form of dewe (due)

NounEdit

dew

  1. Alternative form of dewe (due)

WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dew

  1. Soft mutation of tew.

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
tew dew nhew thew
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ZazakiEdit

EtymologyEdit

Compare Persian ده(deh).

NounEdit

dew ?

  1. village

DeclensionEdit

See alsoEdit