EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ulcus (sore). Doublet of ulcer.

NounEdit

ulcus (plural ulcera)

  1. (palynology) A rounded, pore-like aperture at either pole of a pollen grain.

Derived termsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From earlier *olcos, from Proto-Italic *elkos, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁élḱos (wound, illness, ulcer), from the root *h₁elḱ-; compare Ancient Greek ἕλκος (hélkos, wound, ulcer), Old Norse illr (bad, sick), Sanskrit अर्शस् (árśas, hemorrhoids).[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ulcus n (genitive ulceris); third declension

  1. sore, ulcer, wound

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun (neuter, imparisyllabic non-i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative ulcus ulcera
Genitive ulceris ulcerum
Dative ulcerī ulceribus
Accusative ulcus ulcera
Ablative ulcere ulceribus
Vocative ulcus ulcera

DescendantsEdit

  • Catalan: úlcera
  • English: ulcus
  • Galician: úcera
  • Italian: ulcera
  • Old French: ulcere
  • Spanish: úlcera

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • ulcus”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ulcus”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • ulcus in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  1. ^ Michiel de Vaan, Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the Other Italic Languages, s.v. "ulcus" (Leiden: Brill, 2008), 637.

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ulcus or French ulcus.

NounEdit

ulcus n (plural ulcuse)

  1. sore, ulcer, wound

DeclensionEdit